Shoes for your shoes


#1

Originally published at: https://boingboing.net/2018/02/12/shoes-for-your-shoes.html


#2

Those “Moon shoes” at the bottom look like a disaster in the making for any parent.

And maybe it’s because I’ve been wearing Birkenstock’s for the better part of my life, but I actually like the style. Could easily be from a sci-fi flic. Green, I say!


#3

Pattens from the middle ages?


#4

Bwaaahahahahahahahahah, go fuck yourself.


#5

As a young lad, I was far ahead of my time.


#6

Now you can see how increased spending opportunities mean harder work for everyone, and more of it, too!


#7


#8

Shoe condoms


#9

Unless they ‘fall out the back of a truck’


#10

so the copy doesn’t mention whether this is specifically for inclement weatherm Since this is coming from China, a “change into slippers for indoors” culture, is this a way to be able to wear your swag kicks in the house?


#11

Now I can cut the soles off my shoes and learn to play the flute!


#12

Not a bad idea at $20. At $355, it’s to keep from having to tread ground where untouchables have walked.


#13

too thick - if you’re looking for something to save the soles of your high end footwear - why not get a steel toe safety overshoe for $28?

this has been a safety moment - mark it down for when OSHA calls.

steel%20toe%20overshoe


#14

maybe sandals for your shoes. These are shoes for your shoes:

The best boots I ever had (pair of neos overshoes).
Warm, waterproof, amazing and fully deserving of the description ‘moon boots’.

Nothing quite like casually walking through a 3-inch Montreal springtime slush puddle, without even breaking stride. If I had to live in a place with real winter again, these are the only boots I’d settle for.


#15

Believe it or not my father, a farmer, has been wearing those things over his workboots on muddy/winter days for decades. Theyre super convenient because he can pop in & out of the house without taking off his workboots, in addition to preventing wet socks and his boots from getting messy.

In the corner of the midwest where he lives, they’re called…drumroll… rubbers.


#16

Heck, this goes back to medieval Europe as well, when they were called Trippen:

Here, I found a link to a website that sells them to reenactors: LINK

EDIT: I didn’t know Trippen were called Pattens. Took too long and Beanolini was faster


#17

lol, excellent


#18

I did not know this!!!

Excellent!


#19

Stamp of approval from Pinball Wizard:


#20

My dad as well…