Slingshots are perfect for shooting zombie targets and tin cans on a nice summer day


#1

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#2

I always wanted one of these as a kid, but I’m pretty sure it’s good that I didn’t get one since I’m sure I would have been up to no good with it. Instead I was forced by my weapon-averse parents to create my own roman-style sling and mount epic crabapple fights against friends. Sure, that can still hurt, but nobody lost any eye. YMMV.

Aside; I like this one but the folding model is more appealing. Also, it’s worth noting that these are apparently illegal in NY. :confused:


#3

I had one of these as a kid and soon ran out of ammo. My mom improvised and bought me dried beans.


#4

I had this exact model when I was a kid. Great design, so fun to shoot.


#5

I think these are more appropriately labeled “wrist rockets” as slingshots are typically just the “Y” shape (adding a brace is still the same ‘weapon’ of course). Notably, and unsurprisingly, the wrist brace allows for greater accuracy and higher speeds. The brace also makes it illegal in some states.


#6

I used to take one on my Great Lakes ore boat trips (Duluth, MN to Detroit (Deerborne), MI and back again) – nothing like having 30,000 tons of ammo on board. My targets were balloons filled 50% water and 50% air.


Taconite pellets were the default ammo in iron ore country…


#7

My son’s cub scout troop did an activity at a slingshot range and they used dry dog food pellets for ammo. Won’t seriously injure anything (except maybe a squirrel’s BMI), but still make a satisfying plink.


#8

My older brother was the wrist rocket aficionado when we were kids. We would stand on the gravel road next to our house and bounce rocks off the boxcars and lumber of the freight train that passed us a half a block away.


#9

I wanted a Crossman sling shot like that when I was a kid. Being poor though, I had to settle for one made from a Y tree branch I whittled, but my dad did find some surgical tubing and a leather pouch for it. The only down side of it was that it didn’t have a wrist brace, which really helps.


#10

I couldn’t wait for the trains to stop on the way into the steel mill near where I grew up. We’d fill gallon jugs with these things and stash them in the woods for a long lasting ammo supply.


#11

I hear that these projectile launchers could be used to “control” drones.


#12

Cute but you are holding it wrong.

You should shoot a slingshot with the handle parallel to the ground, using the top of the fork as your aiming point. This is safer because if the pellet falls out of the pocket before it passes the forks, it will not hit you in the hand. This is especially a risk with pebbles. I’ve shot wrist rockets this way for years and my lower fork is plenty dinged up.


#13

It is my understanding that this is not the optimal configuration for a sling shot. You notice that when you pull back the pouch that your wrist bends up and puts strain on the shot. And when the wrist comes forward, you tend to push forward.

There were the classic Y sling shots, and these are supposed to be the best, even without the wrist supports. You hold the handle horizontally and brace the tops of the Y with a fore finger and a thumb. It makes your wrist lock into place and allows for much better targeting. My uncle hunted grouse with them for years.


#14

What happens when a lawnmower encounters some of those steel balls?


#15

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