Teacher who said Trump aide Stephen Miller was a "strange dude" who ate glue is suspended


#21

Nothing strange about that. I used to love to do that with Elmer’s glue.

Oh.


#22

I am not suggesting you are wrong, or need to shut up.

Legitimately, if digging up dirt going back to grade school has been a thing in the past, please correct me. It really did sound like that was the case to me, based on what you said.


#23

Okay. Have a great day.


#24

There has been a great deal of reporting about Stephen Miller’s teacher’s suspension, and how weird Miller was as a child. Donald Trump was not only weird, but dangerous.

In Trump Revealed (M. Kranish and M. Fisher, cited by Susan Ohanian, Trump, Trump, Trump: The March of Folly , ShiresPress) a former teacher shared this observation about Trump with family members: “When that kid was ten, even then he was a little shit.”

The Washington Post reported more from Trump Revealed on June 22, 2016: (“Confident. Incorrigible. Bully: Little Donny was a lot like candidate Donald Trump”). Here are some samples:

A neighbor’s child recalled that he was told to“stay away from the Trumps.”: When a little boy, Donald was seen throwing rocks at a toddler in the child’s playpen next door.

When Trump was a student at a military academy, after a teammate made an out in a baseball game, Trump broke the teammates’ bat, smashing it on the pavement, and never apologized.

Trump had a fight with his roommate over keeping the room neat, and tried to throw him out of a second-floor window, until other cadets stopped him.

Another schoolmate related that Trump “had a reputation for saying anything that came into his head…”. When Trump misidentified a pro wrestler, the schoolmate recalled, “We would laugh at him and tell him he was wrong, and he’d say he was right. The next time, he would make the same mistake, and it would be the same thing all over again.”

The headmaster of the academy was quoted as saying: “He wanted to be number one. He wanted to be noticed. He wanted to be recognized. And he liked compliments.”

According to his sister, Trump “was a brat.” (Interview, Feb. 10, 2005, Timothy L. O’Brien, TrumpNation, The Art of Being The Donald , 2005)

Trump’s behavior was not the same as Stephen Miller’s. Trump didn’t eat glue, and while Miller was messy, Trump was a neat freak. But in both cases, one wonders if early intervention and therapy would have prevented the behavior problems these men have today, and the negative consequences their behavior has had for the world.


#25

Which glue are we talking about?

The almost minty white paste, the amber stuff with the rubber tip applicator, or plain white glue?


#26

I would have done the same thing. I don’t know if you’ve raised any kids, but as a parent I’ve seen some strange and inappropriate things show up on school records, and asking that these be removed is hardly “enabling”, it is parental responsibility.

For the record, his parents are solid progressives and the children of Jewish pogrom refugees, maybe you can find a better pejorative than “little Eichmann”.


#27

I’m not a parent, but I’ve helped rais enough other parents’ kids to have heard the stories. They have indeed told me they’ve seen some strange and inappropriate things show up on report cards. They discussed them with the teacher and administrator but, having a sense of perspective, don’t demand that they be whited out.

Most parents understand that (contrary to schoolyard myth) a comment on 3rd grade report card about eating paste and avoiding the company of other children to an unusual degree is not something that’s part of his “permanent record” – certainly not to the degree it needed to be whited out.

This strikes me as more parental denial of a set of strange but not uncommon 3rd-grader problems that needed to be addressed at the time instead of whited out. The parents I know have told me many eye-rolling stories about those kinds of over-indulgent parents.

I don’t care if his parents themselves survived Auschwitz. “Little Eichmann” is a good descriptor for a government official who’s been instrumental in this “Nazi Jr.” regime’s policy of stripping kids who are 3rd graders from their parents and placing them in internment* camps solo. I’ll stick with “Little Eichmann”.

If you want to keep downplaying Miller’s part in this horror or his parents’ possible role in what he became, feel free. I’m done with this discussion and will let some of his other family members (not his parents) have the final word on him (they seem to prefer “Goebbels”, which is inaccurate but which I’ll allow):

[* I’d say concentration camps, but I have a feeling you’d object to the term]


#28

Speaking as someone who is an actual (not vicarious) parent, you are wrong. The stuff on the elementary school record can come up the entire time the student is in that school system, in unexpected ways.

I’m not downplaying Miller’s role - he’s a horror - and he’s implementing policies reminiscent to those of the Nazis, which is especially bad because of his origin, but there is a difference between saying that he is doing that (as his family has) and calling him an actual Nazi (as you did). And, w/r to your last sentence, snark is not normally appropriate when a member of a minority points out that terms you use to describe members of that minority are offensive.


#29

Again, his family members are calling him “Goebbels.” Is the Nazi Minister of Propaganda somehow less of a hateful fascist than the COO (or maybe executive VP) of the Final Solution was? If not you have just as much issue with Miller’s family members as you do with me.

Also, you have no idea whether or not I’m a member of that same minority or whether or not I had family members who died the last time people were scared to call a Nazi a Nazi.

Unless a kid was torturing and killing small animals no-one really cares what he was doing at age 9 in school. 3rd graders do weird things and act strangely all the time, things that they didn’t do in 2nd grade or 4th grade. Which is why that part of the story has no value to anyone here, myself included.


#30

^^ what mostly everyone said
I definitely don’t like Miller, but it was pretty stupid to do that


#31

No they aren’t. That’s not in your link. The difference between what they are saying and calling him a Nazi is subtle, it is labeling actions instead of labeling people, but it is the difference between a strong descriptor and the antisemitic trope of calling Jews Nazis.

no-one really cares what he was doing at age 9 in school

Nobody cares now, but it might have had an effect when he was age 10 or 11, which is why his parents were right in getting the inappropriate comments expunged.

whether or not I’m a member of that same minority

Well, now I hope to hell you are, as otherwise that sentence alone would be grossly offensive cultural appropriation.


#32

From David Glosser’s FB feed (no objections noted. Perhaps they’re all appropriating their Jewish heritage because that’s the only way someone is allowed to comment on the Shoah):


#33

As I said, “the difference between what they are saying and calling him a Nazi is subtle, it is labeling actions instead of labeling people, but it is the difference between a strong descriptor and the antisemitic trope of calling Jews Nazis.”

And of course anyone can discuss the Holocaust, in fact everyone should, but for someone to falsely imply that they are Jewish while doing it would be despicable.


#34

My religious background or lack thereof is no-one’s business, but you do understand that non-Jews died in the camps and in the war caused by the Nazis, right?


#35

If it is nobody’s business, then why bring it up?

Many people died in WWII, but the meaning of the the Nazi atrocities is different to different cultures.


#36

I didn’t. You made it an issue suggested I might be engaging in cultural appropriation or alternatively might be making an anti-Semetic statement if I’m not Jewish myself.

I call him a little Eichmann because I’ve studied the history long enough to smell the type. Miller reeks of it, Jewish or not. His religious heritage only makes it more shameful, as his own relatives point out.


#37

Look, I think we agree on all the political issues here, but I don’t need lectures on what as a Jew I am permitted to be offended at. If you don’t understand the point about cultural appropriation, try translating it to similar statements about other minorities; I’m a little surprised you’re not more sensitive to this.

Please let’s not derail this thread any further on this.