Texas judge orders prison to provide inmates with safe drinking water


#1

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#2

By the map I see they put it directly in the “middle of nowhere”.


#3

Typical Soft on Crime Liberals! Prison isn’t supposed to be a vacation! It’s supposed to be so awful that it breaks you all up inside, scrambling the wiring in your head, so that when you’re released back out in to the public you fit in with us normal, moral, law-abiding citizens!


#4

How is safe water a "contemporary standard of decency?"
Water is essential- and how is knowingly providing unsafe water to prisoners not outright abuse?
I don’t.
We’ve never had a good conversation in this country about if prisons are for punishment or for rehabilitation. It seems pretty clearly shifted towards punishment, but that seems so ludicrously short-sighted I can’t imagine how we go there. Most of the folks locked up aren’t in for life- so they’re going to get out. Not providing them with any/better coping mechanism just raises the likelihood of them ending up back inside (which, I’d point out, is expensive to taxpayers).
Shouldn’t the Party of Fiscal Responsibility be on this? Fixing these folks must be cheaper than the revolving door we currently have…


#5

Now, if they can just get a judge to order that the State of Michigan must provide its residents with safe drinking water…


#6

#7

The judge is probably saying “contemporary standard of decency” because the words “human rights” have lost all meaning in that country, so many are the abuses heaped upon the ill and damaged there.


#8

Until now, I’ve never given a ‘Like’ to every single person on a thread.


#9

It’s competing values within the same camp. Conservatives appear to have a bloodlust for vengeance, but don’t want to spend tax money to achieve their ill-considered ends. So, they bust the prison guard union, farm out maintenance to bust some branches of AFSCME unions, and privatize all prison operations, all with the delusion that the profit margin private corporations demand is magically less money than paying public employees who maybe, kinda, had morals.


#10

So basically the conservatives are using Camp Sumter/Andersonville Prison as a model for modern prisons.

“It was overcrowded to four times its capacity, with an inadequate water supply, inadequate food rations, and unsanitary conditions.”


#11

Don’t I recall it was the Bush administration that went to the mat to fight for increased levels of arsenic in drinking water? Maybe they know something we don’t. Maybe arsenic is brain food!


#12

I had a former boss who served 7 years in prison in the 1950. He went in prepared for his life to be over. His family disowned him and his friends told him to never come back. While he was in he volunteered for every work detail he could and he learned most hands on aspects of the construction trade. The Warden even had him do some light restoration on the prison owned mansion he and his family lived in next to the prison, trusting him with dangerous tools around his wife and children. When he was paroled, he walked out onto a construction crew and over the course of his life he built a good business, had a small family, and left his wife with over a million dollars when he died. When I worked for him I was getting ready to leave for college. He told me that for him, prison was all that he tried to make it. He used it as an apprenticeship and the chance to grow up and mature.

I’ve had a few friends my age go to prison and it still seems to be what you make of it. Some of the friends went in for drugs and prison didn’t do one single thing to rehabilitate them or their addictions. One friend went in for drugs and manslaughter. He worked on himself and when he came out he had two college degrees, was a trained butcher, and he shook the hands of his guards when he walked out the door.

I know these are only anecdotes, but I think if we started refocusing prisons on rehabilitation we might spend more money per incarceration. The overall goal would be to make sure that recidivism drops and most are only inmates once.


#13

I would argue that’s how it is supposed to work, and it’s how the prison system works in other countries.

Unfortunately, here in the US we have a Prison-industrial complex and it’s very profitable to keep prisons filled with exploitable and cheap labor.


#14

Like Flint, Mi.


#15

Fox news everyone:


#16

Also, this isn’t really suburban Houston


#17

Well I’m sold! Where do I apply?


#18

Dear Gods. It’s like they’re copy from some idiotic talking point check list or something.

  • Failure to understand what EPA standards really mean
  • Statement that previous standards were good enough
  • Horrible situation is actually fine
  • Prison isn’t meant to be comfortable (Bonus points: stated exactly)
  • Positive comparison / praise for Maricopa County, AZ
  • Troops in war zones

I’m think we’ve got the makings of a new social issue bingo card.


#19

I don’t have a source, but a decade or two ago I heard that Texas prisons generally have no heat or air conditioning. They assume that (or don’t care whether) the hottest and coldest temps possible will be survivable by prisoners.


#20

So is it inhumane to have prisoners subjected to more than 88 degrees compared to people who work in unairconditioned places that are subject to 100+ routinely during the summer months?