The baobabs are dying


#22

Ok, world - if you could knock it off with the deluge of the kind of news stories that play in the background in global catastrophe/horror movies, that’d be great. They’re getting a bit excessive.


#23

From what I’m reading online, I think the researchers core sampled the baobabs, and as of 2015 no studies have been done to determine if the procedure used was safe for these trees.

After each coring, the increment borer was disinfected with methyl alcohol. The small coring holes were sealed with Steriseal (Efekto), a special polymer sealing product, for preventing any possible infection of the trees.

Since stressed trees are weaker, changing climate could still be a contributing factor regardless of any other causes - but if I were one of these researchers, I’d cross-section those dead baobabs and look real hard at any coring wounds before advancing any theories. And maybe testing both “Steriseal” and methyl alcohol injection against some seedling baobabs from the same trees would be a good idea…


#24

Is this an Operation gelungen, Patient tot scenario?


#25

Whitest of bears? You mean they’re French surrender bears? No point saving them if they won’t save themselves. Weak.

#surrenderbears


#26


#27

I don’t speak Baobab, but I wonder if their popular media ran stories about alien abduction?


#28

A polar bear has black skin, and its fur is translucent. A polar bear’s apparent whiteness is only an illusion.

Polar bears are so well-adapted to live in cold climates, the sunlight can penetrate the colorless fur easily, and then the black skin is most effective at absorbing and retaining that light as heat. And, as a bonus for hiding the snowy landscape, the sunlight refracting through the hair(which are hollow tubes) makes the polar bear seem even whiter, than if it had white fur.

P.S. save the polar bears, please


#29

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