The best way to reduce the jerk factor on your Twitter account


#1

Originally published at: https://boingboing.net/2018/01/23/the-best-way-to-reduce-the-jer.html


#2

“And you can import other people’s block lists via a free service called Block Together”

What could possibly go wrong?

I’ll be responsible for my own damn echo chamber, thank you very much!


#3

Mutes are useful for soft-blocking the annoying and intellectually dishonest here, too.

Twitter being Twitter, they put in their own Mute and Block features and just left it at that. If they actually took the time to use the analytic data those humans responsible for moderation (generously assuming there are such people at Twitter) could easily identify problem users before deciding to whether or not to ban them.


#4

My rule is that I mute the annoying and block the intellectually dishonest.

No no! You have to argue with them. Prove them wrong! This is the internet we’re talking about!


#5

Fbook & Twitter are poison, avoid at all costs.


#6

Yup. Dumping either entirely = no trolls from them at all ^^’.


#7

no. i refuse to cede the digital landscape to dicks and nazis. i stay and i engage. i’ve never had to outright block anyone, but i’ve certainly muted some.


#8

Pick your battles.

I was never on Twitter, but I did maintain a FB page out of a sense of obligation to my distant family and sorority sisters. (Basically, it existed as an all purpose notification stating that “yes; I’m still alive” and “no; haven’t ‘let myself go’.”)

Then one day, something went wonky with my pc’s database and it ‘broke’ my account, making it so that I could no longer log in. Best thing that ever happened to me, via computer.


#9

Having nuked my twitter accounts last year I can attest to its effectiveness. It’s great for mental health.


#10

I second that. I locked myself out of Twitter and Facebook last year. Apparently people are still arguing with me on both platforms, but I’m not there to argue back. So much healthier.


#11

I’ve never had an issue with trolls on twitter, but I do employ soft blocking. I find it useful for getting rid of those accounts that you know are simply mass-following to gain followers, or preemptively shoo away people who seem like bad news but also the type to develop a grudge if they discover they are blocked. Useful all around!


#12

@frauenfelder

The best way to avoid the many trolls, Russian agents, and nazis that Twitter is eager to host is to stop using Twitter.

PERIOD. FULLSTOP. The article was utter brilliance with just this line. But like a Bob Ross, you had to *** it up by continuing to add crappy things.


#13

Check and check.


#14

I mean, I only have a twitter account for when I need to view something it doesn’t let you view anonymously.

Hasn’t become needed yet.

I recall what I said when a coworker explained twitter to me on its release.

Coworker: “OK, so it’s like the Facebook status thing, but like that’s ALL it is!”
Me: “Why do I want that?”
Coworker: “I don’t know!”
Me: “I will pass”

There is literally nothing I have seen so far to make me want to post stuff to twitter. I try to avoid most social network stuff anymore, really.

Except for trolling my sister on Facebook of course. That remains super worthwhile.


#15

I’m sure there are dozens of us. Although, with an open, inaccessible account, I wonder if mine is ripe for identity theft or other hi-jinks . That said, it brings up the old misogynist joke: Someone stole my wife’s credit card, but I never reported it because they spend less.


#16

Focus on the positive contributions made by the other 99.9 percent.

Confused, I thought the advice was to to block PR and the intellectually dishonest?


#17

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