The bizarre magnetic forest rings of northern Ontario


#1

[Read the post]


#2

Not exactly a peer-reviewed bit of science. I might also add that ‘fairy rings’ are seen elsewhere, and have somewhat simpler explanations!


#3

I was going to say something about a typo in the supra-subtitle, but I just figured it out. Heh.


#4

These sciency types always get so desperate when the answer isn’t in the textbook. Obviously, it’s the dancing-rings of the Little People.


#5

The answer is always in the Bible:

God is trying out some new cookie cutters.


#6

They are the great wheels of Ezekiel chapter 1:

Now as I looked at the living creatures, I saw a wheel upon the earth beside the living creatures, one for each of the four of them. As for the appearance of the wheels and their construction: their appearance was like the gleaming of a chrysolite; and the four had the same likeness, their construction being as it were a wheel within a wheel…


#7

“Fairy rings” aren’t magnetic, though.

Given the mineral deposits the area is famous for, is not that surprising. It does make me wonder how the magnetic poles affect the land/oceanscape.


#8

Odd magnetic fields may have all sorts of causes, and yes, ‘fairy rings’ seem to be about plant growth feedback, fungi, etc. The terms used in the source article are very loose, and make me smell Silly Season. Your mileage may vary.


#9

Sharknado!


#10


#11

This could be caused by spreading fungal root disease in the forest. Here are aerial photos from a wilderness area near Waldo Lake in the Oregon Cascades. https://www.google.com/maps/@43.8516851,-122.0188655,1190m/data=!3m1!1e3?hl=en


#12

A far, far better report on this phenomena, can be found here (with a whole 30 seconds of Googling). Note the complete absence of any mention of “magnetism” or defying gravity, or other apparent crackpottery.


#13

I was going to say, I bet it is a fungal thing.


#14

Here’s a better description of them - less “gushy”…

http://www.cbc.ca/news2/background/tech/science/forest-rings.html


#15

Manaugh is one of the treasures of the internet. His writing isn’t supposed to be taken as science. He is something of an impressionist or fantasist. Definitely more poetry than documentary. Stream of consciousness fugues on the nature of form.

I love his writing.


#16

Why sign a release? There’s plenty of trash cans.


#17

That photo obviously shows where Canada used to test its bombs. They grew over again because they weren’t nuclear.

Oops, sorry, internet. Nucular.


#18

I always felt portions of the bible (especially the bits that have been conveniently left out in later centuries) were heavily influenced either by hallucinogens or alien visitations.


#19

Hamilton was testing an analytical technique over a Matheson gold deposit to determine if there was any kind of geochemical surface signal. To his surprise, there were signals coming through 30 to 40 metres of glacial clay._

mmmhmmm


#20

Things will grow even on nuke ground zero. Chernobyl had quite worse contamination than what a puny nuke can do, pound by pound of radioactive isotopes, and even the Red Forest is pretty green now, I was there and lived to tell the tale. Once you’re done with the short-halflife isotopes (couple days to few weeks), all you got to deal with are strontium-90 and caesium-137, which the ecosystem deals with fairly well.

The neutron-induced radiation is usually of pretty short half-life.