The life-changing technique Michael Lewis wrote on a Chipotle cup

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The soft tacos is how I get around the problem of chipotle selling me too much food.

They really need a half order size.

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I just tell them to omit the rice. Problem solved, mic dropped.

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I only eat at Chipotle at gunpoint, so I have to eat what I’m told to whether I’m full or not.

Joke © @funruly circa 2014

All lies. I have never eaten at a Chipotle. Should I?

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Skip it. Your quality of life will not be diminished by the absence of 2014’s Fast Casual Champeen.

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Meh. It’s OK if you’re desperate and stuck with chains as your only option.

(I personally like Moe’s or Qdoba more because they give you free chips, but sometimes it’s any port in a storm)

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Malcolm Gladwell wrote one? I wonder what incredibly obvious thing he relabeled this time, to make it appear he discovered something? Maybe “The Unrising Effect: How Things Tend to Fall Towards the Earth”.

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It’s easily the best of the current crop of burrito joints. I recommend going with corn salsa and steak; their steak is marinated in something spicy and wonderful. They do have a smaller selection of items than most places–burrito, burrito bowl, soft tacos, crispy tacos, salad, and chips are pretty much the size of it–but a greater choice of fillings than the rest. They’re also the only place I’ve seen that has actual chipotle sauce in bottles, which is smoky and delicious. I like to mix it into the guacamole for my chips.

If you’re into corporate responsibility, be aware that Chipotle is sufficiently committed to animal welfare that when a major pork supplier wasn’t meeting their standards recently, they removed pork from their menu until they could find a more humane supplier. (This was several weeks ago–details here.)

Oh! Speaking of stuff printed on Chipotle disposables, it was a Chipotle napkin that taught me the proper way to eat a foil-wrapped burrito. You just peel the foil off the top, then pull it away in a spiral as you descend, so the bottom doesn’t come open and empty the burrito in your lap.

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Malcolm Gladwell wrote one?

His cup doesn’t hold water.

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Aw, c’mon, you can’t fool me! All burritos should be eaten as quickly as possible with a device in the other hand and your knee against the steering wheel to drive. Hey, stop honkin’ - can’t you see I’m on the phone!!

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I was hoping to find a discussion of time perception rather than restaurant choices (the much less interesting aspect of this post.)

Time perception research shows that Mr. Lewis is on to something. http://www.popsci.com/science/article/2010-03/how-time-flies

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“How best, does one eat a Chipotle burrito?”

On weed…

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Where did this thing come from where people get absolutely frothy with disdain about restaurants they don’t prefer? It’s weird.

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See Jon Stewart every time he mentions one of my favorite joints:

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You’re right, but it’s easier to discuss the bike shed than the nuclear diagram written on the side of the bike shed.

This is probably worth a separate thread. The TL:DR from my perspective is

national chain retailers of edible products <-------------> proper eateries

Chipotle’s not a bad imitation of the real burrito joints here in the SF Bay Area. You pick your main ingredients, they put it on the tortilla or bowl, you pick the things to add to it, they roll it up and you eat. Their ingredients are reasonably good, and while a chain can’t quite duplicate an individually run place, they do pretty well. Their tofu stuff is obviously not at all authentic, but since I’m a vegetarian I’m used to that problem, and it’s really pretty good.

The last time I was in Detroit, I happened to see a Qdoba Mexican-style fast-food joint, figured it would be the closest I could find (and it was next to Tim Horton’s), and it was surprisingly good for whatever beans/cheese/sauce/tortilla thing I had.

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Funny enough, from today’s NYT Magazine

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See, I can see that as a rough principle, like when you’re in a strange town and you’ve got a choice between a national chain and a local eatery, you hit the local place. What I don’t get are the people who insist that a restaurant’s chain/independent status is the only thing that matters, as if a good recipe turns rancid in your mouth just because it’s also being served in a different town somewhere.

Chipotle is good food. Maybe it’s not as good as an authentic Mission burrito from SF, but I’m two thousand miles from SF, so who cares? It’s tasty and satisfying and filling, and the company is not AFAIK involved in any truly reprehensible practices, and that’s all that matters.

I wonder how much of it is bound up in the recent passion for “authenticity” in food. I’m glad that authentic experiences are available for those who prefer them, and I do enjoy knowing something about the history and origins of the food I’m eating, but the important thing when I eat out is that the food is tasty to me. I do like trying new dishes, but I’m not going to pretend to enjoy something I don’t just because it’s more “authentic” than a well-made General Tso’s chicken or, indeed, Chipotle burrito.

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