The RS Politics 2020 Democratic Primary Leaderboard

#21

I think you’re just Putin us on.

8 Likes
#22

That would be the idea in the first place. Having grown up listening to the horror stories members of my former large family were telling reluctantly about the time in Poland, when the main avenue in Lodz was renamed into Adolf Hitler Strasse’, I am painfully aware of the suffering and pain people had to endure in the darkest time of European history.
I grew up rejecting any form of partisanship and division among people. One needs to ask oneself though, where these divisions come from. Sure, the old ‘Divide et Impera’ still stands, but why would people of the same standing engage in it ever since?
At this point in time, I have no more illusions aka hope, that there will be a quantum leap in the collective human consciousness in my life time.
When is enough enough?

#23

Then maybe stop denying antisemitism?

4 Likes
#24

I don’t deny anti-semitism. I simply believe that not everything that is called that, is really it. The anti-semitism I know about was practical. Deep hate - implanted in the minds of people that would have not acted out violently against those with whom they had previously lived in peace.
That’s the biggest problem. Anti-semitic, anti-indigenous, or anti-other sentiment is not part of the human DNA. It is artificially created by those who profit from it in any form.
It is for that reason that I am of the opinion that we, as human collective could have overcome this stain on humanity a long time ago. One does not have to look far to realize why that has not happened yet - especially since 1945.

#25

You seem to think it’s an invention of the modern period…

meaning

Literally no one said that. That doesn’t mean it just existed in recent memory… it has a deep history in European Christianity.

That doesn’t mean it isn’t real and hasn’t been real for centuries in Europe.

Much like ignoring racism in the US won’t help end it, neither will denying anti-semitism.

[ETA] Here is an example of a pogrom in Kiev… which indicates that both local conditions and the larger imperial context contributed… it was never just propagated by the elites. That did not help and contributed to the growth of events like this, but people have agency and they can make choices. That’s always been the case and will always be the case.

4 Likes
#26

That means it had practical implications - that people took their hate to a level where they had to exterminate those whom they were convinced of being inferior.

In a famous scientific study, it was possible to turn everybody into a torturer. Everybody.

#27

And that’s an excuse…?

Oh please. The Stanford prison experiment has never been successfully replicated, for one. Second, maybe read Browning with regards to specific issues around antisemitism and violence.

Then maybe read some Primo Levi…

As much as people are subject to various kinds of pressure, many people still found a way to resist and to reject it. Human psychology isn’t an excuse for this kind of violence. It’s just not. Sorry.

7 Likes
#28

That is denial of antisemitism. Partial denial is still denial.

U8e38EI|nullxnull https://i.imgur.com/U8e38EI.gif

3 Likes
#29

The Penguin Atlas of Recent History used Fred W Rose’s “Angling in Troubled Waters A Serio-Comic Map of Europe” for it’s cover, and so I thought myself familiar with the concept.

what I din’t realize is that the same illustrator had been producing maps like this for decades.

In the 1877 and 1900 maps,russia is depicted as an octopus.

This auctioneer has a pair of 1880 seriocomic maps of Europe, in Farsi, depicting rival views of the war. The auction house attributes them to Fredric Rose and K. I. Kordig-- apparently Kordig drew his Rusophillic map in response to Rose-- it wasn’t a partnership.

2 Likes
#30

Meanwhile, misleading polls misinterpreted as support for conservative liberals…

closed #31

This topic was automatically closed 30 days after the last reply. New replies are no longer allowed.