The teachers' strikes are spreading


#1

Originally published at: https://boingboing.net/2018/04/29/open-rebellion.html


#2

How do you get away with proposing 6 months of jail time for going on strike?

This is an impressive low as a human being, and a bad case of begging for the Streisand effect to take effect.

I’m surprised that the teachers strike hasn’t made “tax billionaires more” one of their rallying cries.


#3

A government monopoly on education leading to worker dissatisfaction and poor student outcomes? How’d that happen?


#4

Well, first you pass Right-to-Work laws. Then, you leave NTSB board seats vacant for years at a time. Then you slash the budget of the Department of Labor. Then, go on Faux News to discuss those greedy do-nothing teachers. Then, you propose six months of jail time for going on strike, and they call you a moderate.

@walter_guyll, government doesn’t have a monopoly on education - only on fair, free, high-quality education.


#5

The Rebel Alliance is strong, join us.


#6

On average teachers at private schools and charter schools are paid considerably less than teachers at traditional public schools, not more.

Also, if you think “government monopoly” automatically leads to poor results for teachers and students then how do so many other countries manage to make it work?


#7

If anyone is wondering why you haven’t seen strikes in Texas:

The statute, enacted in 1993, says any employees who “strike or engage in an organized work stoppage against the state or a political subdivision of the state” will lose all their “civil service rights, reemployment rights, and any other rights, benefits, and privileges the employee enjoys as a result of public employment or former public employment.”

– Fort Worth Star Telegram

Because, of course they did.

(My wife is the campaign manager for a Democratic Texas educator running for the state house of representatives. One of many things he’ll have to try to change.)


#8

My mom was a para for behavior disorder kids in middle school for many years. The system is broken in many ways and honestly the teachers probably have a better idea how to fix it (overall).


#9

We have to be just a thuggish back to state legislatures - 6 month jail time for ethics violations.


#10

https://ope.ed.gov/accreditation/


#11

Roger That


#12


#13

Because of the kind of politics that produces such arrantly foolish statements as that?


#14

When politicians control schools, education will not be the priority.


#15

And when the Ayn-caps control schools it will?

:rofl:


#16

Why does it have to be one group or another controlling schools? Doesn’t seem like a natural monopoly.


#17

Ayn-caps will make it one by controlling what skills they want. Why would someone who hates paying taxes want to spend their money teaching humanities to someone who they think will only be doing manual labour?

Yes, children could go to a school that teaches them, if they are fortunate enough to have parents rich enough to pay for it. My parents couldn’t afford private schools, and they were not poor, so what chance do smart working class kids have?

It’s not that I trust the government to do a good job, it’s that I have several orders of magnitude less trust in Ayn-caps.


#18

That is an excellent question to ask your politicians!


#19

A private, market-driven solution to education doesn’t make sense unless you think education should only be for those families who can already afford it. I think of education as a long-term social investment. Even if you are not a student, even if you don’t have children who are students, you still benefit from living in a society where most people know how to read/do basic arithmetic/have a working knowledge of history and social studies, etc.


#20

I already know how so many other countries make government-funded education work.

So do the striking teachers.

Maybe you should try listening to them.