This day, you will be mesmerized by pasta


#1

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#2

The Eucharist of the FSM?


#3

The day may come when the fascination with industrial pasta production of men will fail. But this is NOT THAT DAY!


#4

Wait, fusili isn’t made by old ladies in smocks any more?


#5

I thoroughly recommend “How it’s made: Pasta”:

Nearly as mesmerising as ‘chains’.


#6

Grrr: “Dried at 150 degrees…” Fahrenheit or Celsius? Kelvin?


#7

Tell me about it.

To cause further confusion, “How It’s Made” has different voiceovers for UK and US broadcasts. So if you watch a random youtube upload, you can’t make any assumptions about what units they might be using.


#8

[BoringPedant] Can’t be Kelvin, because it mentions degrees.[/BoringPedant]

And also, you know, the other thing…


#10

By the look of that extruder plate (notice the circular discontinuities around each pasta-port) it would appear that you can swap out each extruder individually.

Is this to allow you to swiftly re-tool the line if demand for various shapes changes, or does even pasta-slurry cause tool wear through sheer persistence?


#11

Honestly, the narration/voice-over work for “How It’s Made” is its greatest tragedy. The show has some gorgeous photography of normally invisible and not obviously accessible to the public industrial processes and hardware; but the chatter is downright insufferable.

Compare to The Secret Life of Machines, which doesn’t have nearly the same level of access; but enjoys unbelievably superior narration.

(Also, if you have not done so already, Fuzzyfungus Commands And Exhorts You To Watch SLoM. Now. Your Life Is Incomplete Without Having Done So. There Can Be No Excuses. Do It. Do It Now. Start At The Beginning And Watch Until The End. You Have Your Orders.)


#12

It’s explained here, in this documentary:


#13

Word on the street is that Arcobaleno is coming out with a more gently priced pro-sumer home model soon…


#14

Yes, I have seen and enjoyed “The Secret Life of Machines”.

Maybe it’s time to watch it again. I’d like to see Tim Hunkin calmly describing the internal combustion engine while a hose breaks free and spews coolant everywhere. Or Rex Garrod explaining why it’s necessary for a fridge owner to leave the room when he adjusts the door seal.

As an aside, my main reason for watching “How it’s made” is that it’s about the only thing my kids will watch that I can stomach.


#15

My friends and I play a little game with How its Made. Deliberately miss the first 5 minutes or so of the program. Then watch it with the sound off. First one to guess what they are making wins


#16

Excellent, though I didn’t mean to single you out, hopefully that was clear. My order applies to all people, sufficiently intelligent animals, aliens, and AIs.

That show is just genius.


#17

Triple helix. Clearly, it’s from a superior being.


#18

I only came here to make sure this was postd. Good one!


#19

I would assume so. Pasta slurry wouldn’t wear through metal at any great speed; meanwhile, I can’t think of a single commercial pasta maker that makes only one shape of pasta.


#20

I don’t know what’s more impressive in those shows - the efficiency of the creation process or the way the machines are built to effortlessly serve their purpose.
Definitely need to check out SLoM as @fuzzyfungus recommended.


#21

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