This nail dispensing hammer is a work of genius


#1

Originally published at: https://boingboing.net/2018/08/24/this-nail-dispensing-hammer-is.html


#2

Neat. I don’t usually hammer nails into foam, but if it works on wood, I’m sold.


#3

Seems great for contractors, for the rest of us there are hammers with magnets in the head.


#4

Two words for you. Pli ers. That works better said out loud, doesn’t it?


#5

Nice idea. I framed houses for to pay my way through university so I can see the utility of this, but I’m afraid the ship has sailed on his target market. http://www.paslode.com/product/cordless-xp-framing-nailer/


#6

I suspect there may be a good reason why hammers are not usually made out of plastic.


#7

No shit. It’s also clearly stated as a prototype. Production model would be titanium and wood.


#8

Came here to say this. Why pay more for a manual hammer that dispenses nails when there are already nail guns?


#9

He’s right that most worksites use both hand hammers and framing nailers, even if the latter is much more common and does the lion’s share of the work. And as for magnetic hammers and pliers, they are fine, but you still have to use your off hand to place the nail and (in the case of pliers) keep it steady. This thing is useful, and assuming it works when manufactured in metal & wood, some big tool company will definitely buy the patent off of him. And if the price isn’t too stupid, I’d buy one - being able to hold stock with one hand while accomplishing the entire nailing operation with the other sounds great to me.


#10

Great idea … it’s the ideal solution to “Oh crap, we put the compressor away too soon”.

And there are always a few nails on any project you can’t use the nail gun with.

ADDING: It does not need electricity OR fuel or compressed air.


#11

For artisanal home builders?


#12

having mashed my digits

I will be the fist in line to buy this thing.

Is that all that’s left? How do you type?


#13

With this hammer, all those times you mashed your digits, you would have impaled them instead.

There must be a better solution.


#14

This problem was solved many decades ago by the far simpler “Cheney Nailer” hammer. http://jtc.net/hchc/nailer/


#15

There was an awful device called the “Autohammer” back around 2000. It was hollow, made of yellow plastic.


#16

Because they aren’t preferable in a number of situations. Say someone is removing a window sash to be replaced with one of slightly varying size. The contractor will have to do demo work at the same time they are framing out a new sill opening. They’re not going to want a heavy powered option hanging off their belt the whole time. This instrument has the advantages of both a construction and demo tool. Because it’s a hammer. There’s a reason contractors still own them and consider them a primary tool.


#17

Neat, but just how large is the niche between hammer and nailgun really?


#18

Plus you can have nail gun fights. Not so much with a nail dispensing hammer.


#19

I love these types of commercials, when they show anyone not using their product as being so incapable of anything you wonder how they manage to live past the day. This one is going into my commercial collection.

You still can, they’ll just be quicker and more decisive.


#20

As a hobbyist framer I’d use this. I don’t have call to buy a compressor but willing to splurge to make jobs easier.

I’m curious for folks with nailguns, when do they bring in the hammer?