Tin Tin, in Periodic Table form


#1

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#2

A useful material. Can also be found in the Captain Haddock of molecules - (C4H9)3Sn


#3

Billions of blistering blue barnacles!


#4

Native of Brussels here. “Tin Tin” is absolutely sacrilegious. His name is Tintin. It does not rhyme with the English word “tin”. Don’t you forget it, you infidels.


#5

pfft

go eat a muscle.


#6

Bah - another Aussie here, and I’m with the Belgian on the absolute sacrilege.

But you’re allowed to not call him Tantan. In English any kind of ‘tin’ rhymes with ‘tin’.


#7

Thanks, deathisastar! I came here to say this.

While we’re at it: It’s not ‘Snowball’, it’s Milou. No, no, no, not as in ‘my loo’, but as in ‘half-wolf’.

And if you have any Greek friends you can confirm this for yourselves: it’s not “π” as in pie, it’s “π” as in pee.

/and after you get off my lawn, stop writing the date as mm/dd/yyyy. Grrr!


#8

It’s not ‘Snowball’, it’s ‘Snowy’.

And that little white thing is half-wolf? You scare easy in Belgium.


#9

Oh my, it’s soo difficult: Tintin, TonTon, TaunTaun. I’m glad we call him Tim in german.


#10

That’s probably why they’re the only country with a fully-lit motorway system.


#11

No, PronounciationHub, it’s not tanetane…it’s as if you’re not fluent in French…or know anyone who speaks French natively.

Tintin: the ‘n’ is silent, the ‘in’ is nasal. As in ‘pain’ (bread), or ‘vin’ (wine). Or ‘saint’ (saint) where both the ‘n’ and the ‘t’ are silent.

To get a very close approximation, pronounce it ‘tantan’ as in the video, but stop before you pronounce the ‘n’.


#12

Every time I accidentally watched Tintin in English, it was so traumatic that I experienced amnesia… Yeah, that’s the ticket!


#13

Oh dear. Watching Tintin is like eating Quorn sausages.

Spielberg’s effort was at least a well animated, complet-ish Tintin, but the characters still lacked depth. The amazing, incredible, thing about Herge is that his characters have depth and dimension, he communicates so well in his artwork that you don’t feel any “emptiness” in the character.

No, watching Tintin should be criminalised. No-one will ever get it right.


#14

That sounds like a dare.

I’m sure people capable of such a feat are walking around right now; the trick is to identify them once you have a nice fat budget lined up, I guess. If Herge could do it decades ago in static 2D, a team of brilliant people can do it today in dynamic 3D, I say.

People continue to get smarter and more capable, but it’s not all that obvious because of the restrictive matrix we find ourselves in; for instance, it’s harder than it should be to identify and coordinate the ideal team to do Herge justice; too many other considerations conspire to make a mockery of that one.

But I’d bet my bottom dollar sufficient numbers of Tintin fans with all the right talents to make it a reality exist.


#15

I know what you mean, and I’ve hope that for 35 years, but even if you could do an excellent Tintin with any team and any budget, it wouldn’t by my Tintin - the one I absorved and cogitated on from those 2D pictures. He fits my world and the influences around me, and my Tintin will differ from yours.

Ultimately, yes - the ultimate team with the ultimate knowledge of me could render the animation and personage - but I reckon that’s 1,000 years away at least.


#16

Nah, come on, I just mean something as good as you could realistically hope for.

Like how I felt after walking into Gravity hoping to see a cool space movie.

You know, Raiders of the Lost Ark good. Jackson seemed to pull it off for Tolkien, according to the JRR tifosi.

I thought the movie was pretty close to perfect visually, but failed by deviating from Herge’s story. Merging storylines I can stomach, but if you’re going to introduce new elements it has to be with a very deft touch indeed… the changes were quite well integrated, but struck a bum note nevertheless.


#17

Yeah, the Tintin movie was at least in the ballpark, but numerous examples of wrongness - e.g. Captain Haddock was a soft fool, rather than a hard-drinking tough sailor who’s come into money.

Realistic hopes … I allow myself to park this wish in unrealistic hopes! Can’t stand it when it’s not quite there. Like the Tintin cartoons - why? why?? why???


#18

I know, huh? The Captain was a mile off. Tintin was pretty damn close to spot-on though, I thought.

…Actually, come to think of it, Golden Claws Haddock is a bit more similar… but they should be true to the character he quickly evolved into. And too much of an accent; I reckon he shouldn’t sound like a stereotype. IMO he should sound like a British version of Harrison Ford.

the Tintin cartoons - why? why?? why???

Don’t even go there.


#19

Regarding corrects pronuxiation. When I was in Greece years ago I was amused to find that a certain town’s name is pronounced “Olybia.” Which means we have been saying the name of the international sports competition wrong for over a hundred years.

I could never get anyone to go along with me though.


#20

Some locals have denied it, but the Greek language has undergone some notable changes since the times when those festivals were actually held. There’s a reason they spelled it Olympia to begin with; we undoubtedly say it in an English way, but the bigger change would be the “y”.

But does it matter? I don’t pronounce Paris the way the French do, because it seems silly in English, or try to put the tones on Běijīng. I’ve never said Väinämöinen’s name right in my life, because I can’t. Maybe I should just stick to typing, where nobody can tell.