Toktoker delights driver with secret gift of a Hot Wheels model matching his car

Originally published at: Toktoker delights driver with secret gift of a Hot Wheels model matching his car | Boing Boing

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Next step: leave a Hot Wheels replica behind after a car has been towed and try to convince the driver that he’s been pranked by Dr. Hank Pym.

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Okay, that little happy dance he did was awesome. Loved it, and loved this person bringing random joy to someone.

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What about leaving a 1:4096 mini-Hot Wheels car in the windshield wiper of the 1:64 Hot Wheels car?

Parenthetically, it feels like this TikTok should have #sponsored tag.

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I’ve been keeping an eye out for the Hot Wheels Perseverance Rover, but I don’t know where I’d leave it since the real one doesn’t have windshield wipers.

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Yes, more wonderful stories like this, please!! Love the comments, too.

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what the hell is the appeal of these “voice” overs on tiktok tho? showing my age i know but wow it is annoying

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Better than a Unicorn Chaser.

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I’ve done this a few times over the years. I like to buy Hot Wheels versions of the cars I own and I usually keep a few in my car. When I see another car of the same make/model as my car, I’ll put a car on the windshield. If/when I’m stopped at gas stations or car events and a little kid takes interest in my car, I’ll usually give them a Hot Wheels (of course after asking permission from the parent/guardian). I never thought to film it though!

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I could possibly arrange a hand-off to one of the scientists at JPL who designed a piece of it!

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Done! Once I find one I’ll be in touch.

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The video creator commented:

This is how me and him became friends, soon we will hunt together✌️

:grimacing:

It used to sound like Siri reading their captions (different voice actor, but similar to my ear), but that actor had never given her permission. Why a Canadian voice actor is suing social media giant TikTok's parent company | CBC News The current voice isn’t as fun.

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Great, but I would like to have someone leave a 64:1 version of one of my Hot Wheels…

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there’s a lot of things about TikTok that annoy the hell out of me, tbh.

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This is so sweet. On my birthday one year, my boss gave me a 1/24 toy replica of my Mustang, complete with stripes. My car was my baby, the first vehicle I’d ever purchased new, and I was so touched by what she did.

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Cute, but like many videos on TikTok, also fiction.

Same guy and car are at the end of one of their previous videos: https://www.tiktok.com/@need4zcars/video/6970737325965921542

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Yeah, I was thinking the reaction was a lot less enthusiastic among my friends who always wanted a Maserati or Lamborghini, but it was all I could afford. :woman_shrugging:t4:
Ok, maybe including a fake car key was the problem there… :smiling_imp:

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You’re right, thanks for pointing this out. The long-haired guy is seen at the end of the video, and his car is even there too.

It just goes to show that the human tendency is to automatically believe what we see. There should be nothing wrong with that, for a feel good video. But it’s unfortunate that this guy feels the need to fabricate something like this (most likely to further his own agenda), instead of doing this authentically in the wild.

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Right, I feel a little conflicted about pointing fakes out like this. On the one hand, it makes people smile and maybe even inspires a little more kindness… on the other hand, you have someone fabricating good deeds so they can build an audience to cash in on.

Of course lots of people fabricate stories for people to enjoy in exchange for money; we have books, tv, movies and the like… but even the feel-good aspects of social media blurs the line between fact and fiction in a way that makes me a little uneasy.

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I understand this conflict. It’s a bit like telling people there is no Easter Bunny or Santa Claus … people feel good from this so is there really any need to burst their bubble? I totally get it.

But then this person potentially gets popular/makes money/etc over duping people.

The medium of social media itself, imo, is a lot of the problem. There’s no built-in way on social media to distinguish any one thing as fact vs fiction. (At least with television & movies, fact vs fiction is more readily identified.)

The problems with social media that we’ve all known for a long time will just continue; the same cycles of misinformation and people not learning to steel themselves against it (the natural propensity to believe happening first) will just keep occurring. There’s no end in sight to it. Maybe Jaron Lanier is right, we all just need to disconnect from it.

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