Tomato Shark tears through tomatoes


#1

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#2

I’ve never seen this before, but it looks like a crutch for people who haven’t developed their knife skills.

What say you, @tropo ?


#3

I used one these years ago while working at a sub shop. Really sped things up. It was tied to the counter next to the slicer and was never washed.


#4

I’ve never seen this before, but it looks like a crutch for people who haven’t developed their knife skills.

Used those years ago when I worked at a fast food place as a teenager. You can core about 20 tomatoes a minute or more, whereas using a knife would give you serious carpal tunnel after your 300th tomato.


#5

I worked in kitchens for years. This sucker (or at least something like it) is a must have. Sure you can use a knife, but not nearly as well and as fast. $7 seems a bit steep tho. Guess I had the cheapo ones :smile:


#6

Came here expecting a SyFy Channel mash-up of Sharknado and Attack of the Killer Tomatoes…


#7

I’ve heard of the tears of a clown before but never the tears of a tomato shark.


#8

thanks @Jonee_Spaz @joey_bladb and @beep54orama. Sounds like it helps a lot when prepping at volume.


#9

sharkmato


#10

Darn you @funruly. I was going to sit this one out.

Since I’ve never cored a tomato before, I will ask this of anyone who has: Would it be possible to avoid the chore by choosing a different type / quality of tomato?


#11

Well you don’t really core Romas, but you still have to get rid of the stem thing. I don’t think there is any tomato that most folks would want to eat the stem part of.


#12

I rarely bother coring them while cooking/preserving unless it’s for looks and just remove the green spider on the top of them.

Avoiding hard core tomatoes while shopping can be tricky, though.


#13

I bet if you encountered such a beast, you’d just core it with your toenail.


#14

I’m amazed that some have never seen or used this common item.

These were standard kitchen stuff. What it does that a ‘corer’ can not do is give you more control to remove the stem of the tomato without mutilating the other parts. So you can pop out the green steam part of a beefsteak tomato and leave the core intact for slices.

It’s also perfect for scraping the ribs off of peppers of all types, and for making melon balls. And for super fancy…potato balls poached in butter.


#15

[quote=“SamWinston, post:14, topic:39939, full:true”]
I’m amazed that some have never seen or used this common item.

These were standard kitchen stuff. What it does that a ‘corer’ can not do is give you more control to remove the stem of the tomato without mutilating the other parts. So you can pop out the green steam part of a beefsteak tomato and leave the core intact for slices.[/quote]

All this talk of control. If BB can raise money for a “Happy Mutant Mobile” I want to see the “Iron Chef” style BB mutant knife skills challenge.


#16

or for people with inadequate thumbnails.


#17

I just eat all the tomato. Sometimes, if they’re big, I’ll slice 'em in half.


#18

I had no idea people cored tomatoes.


#19

Smaller tomatoes – cherry tomatoes, tomatillos etc. – are fine with the core attached.

If you were cooking a “rough” sauce (seeds, skins, etc), you’d just cook the tomatoes with the cores attached, and then throw it in the blender. Nobody’s the wiser. But if you’re slicing raw tomatoes for burger and sandwiches, you end up with a fibrous chunky nub on one or two slices.

But during the winter months around here, the tomatoes could all be described as fibrous chunky nubs.


#20

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