UK government rejects Brexit do-over petition with 4.1m signatures


#1

[Read the post]


#2

You’ve made your bed. Now go lie in it. Wankers.


#3

So they want to the really hard and long how to prepare a plan on how to start the article 50 triggering?

I may interpret too much, but it feels as if the government still hopes to negotiate the exit terms and subsequent agreement before even beginning the exit process according to EU treaties in earnest.


#4

So you’re blaming people that got lied to that they fell for it?

Christ, what an asshole.


#5

That’s what I read in the government’s response.


#6

Can’t lie in it. 52% of the people who sleep in the bed burnt the house to the ground.

I really don’t see why. It was an idiotic, poorly informed decision. Besides which, who gives a rat’s ass what David Cameron’s opinion on anything is any more?


#7

Sometimes the world is better understood by incorporating into ones model the concept of “spite”


#8


#9

Dat bowtie, bro. It needs that vest, but it works so well.


#10

Well, that is essentially the same response i’ve had emailed back for every single gov petition i’ve signed, so no surprise there…


#11

They chose to believe the lies. It’s not like they couldn’t, you know, inform themselves from other sources. And maybe next time there’s an election, they’ll get off their asses and go vote. The solution isn’t to ask for a do-over, the solution is to vote in a new government that can then petition the EU for a new membership. Otherwise, yeah. They got what they asked for, actively or passively.


#12

I realize that constitutional concerns may preclude the gathering of definitive intelligence on this matter, but I would be curious to learn what the civil service thinks of this. On the one hand, it’ll be nice to see all that power devolve from a foreign unelected bureaucracy onto a British unelected bureaucracy, but I’m to understand that they lack certain expertise in areas that were formerly handled by Brussels-- e.g. trade.


#13

The Government always refuses petitions, that site was set up purely so the Government of the day can say that they listened.


#14

No-one’s mentioning the hilarious photo with the appropriately located microphone?


#15

It’s an interesting situation - how many other votes would have a completely different outcome if you polled the exact same people a couple days after they cast their initial vote? The buyer’s remorse is strong with this one. A poll taken immediately after the vote indicated that enough pro-Brexit voters wished to change their vote to remain to change the outcome - there were enough “protest voters” who didn’t actually want to leave the EU (but inexplicably voted that way, even though it was known to be such a close election going in). Even more inexplicably, a very small percent of “stay” voters also wished to change their votes… (They saw the economy collapsing and thought, “I wish I had a part in that!”?)


#16

Why should a petition with 4.1 million signatures overturn a democratic vote of 17 million? Anyway, the EU are anti-democratic, globalist neo-liberal thugs - baffled why anybody on the left supports Britain - or anybody else - staying in the EU as it is currently constituted.


#17

The government has responded to the petition you signed – EU Referendum Rules triggering a second referendum.

"The European Union Referendum Act received Royal Assent in December 2015, receiving overwhelming support from Parliament. Just as we were too clueless then to see that framing a complex issue as a simple yes/no question and playing into the hands of political opportunists and flag-waving race-baiters was probably a poor idea, we are now too spineless and inept to make even the smallest effort to unscramble the raging clusterfuck we have created.

Based on expert advice, the government has determined that it would be, if not actually unlawful, certainly tiresome and inconvenient to try to do anything about this whole shitshow. The government has therefore concluded that the best course of action, having thrown the match down, is to shrug indifferently and sprint away from the resulting conflagration, pretending we had nothing to do with it and leaving someone else to clean up the mess.

The Referendum was one of the largest democratic exercises in British history, one in which a significant proportion of British voters expressed their unambiguous support for sovereignty, self-determination, and having all those Polish wankers who are all over the place just now fuck off back to Warsaw at the earliest possible opportunity. The government notes in particular that any attempt to show a little spine at this late stage might further alienate those voters who voted to Leave, driving them into the arms of that oily little turd Farage and his goose-stepping ‘Little England’ friends. This is something that the government – already struggling for popular support as it tries to decide which of the two icy-hearted neo-liberal hell-bitches currently vying to be party leader it should cram down the throats of the electorate next – considers entirely unacceptable.

As the Prime Minister made perfectly clear in his statement to the House of Commons, many of the architects of this unequalled disaster have already left politics to take up jobs as city directors and newspaper columnists, or to spend more time at their private residences with a severed sow’s head. Neither they, nor anyone who remains, have the slightest interest in trying to undo the unnecessary catastrophe created by the recent dick-size war between two prominent Old Etonians. It is the government’s firm and nearly unanimous opinion that the government isn’t about to touch that, no way José. While the government notes that the vote to Leave has had a significant impact on the British economy, with the pound currently trading at near-parity with the Albanian lek, the government anticipates that continued uncertainty over a possible exit would only make things worse for government members and major donors now desperately trying to move their assets overseas. It is therefore the government’s position, supported by the results of detailed studies conducted by the Civil Service, that about all we can usefully do for the United Kingdom now is to put a bullet in its head and saunter away whistling.

The die is cast. The shit has hit the fan. We must now prepare for the process to exit the EU with as much calm, British stoicism and grimly-resigned fatalism as possible. The government wants nothing more to do with any part of this whole goatfuck rodeo. While the government respects the concerns of citizens looking forward to a future in which the shattered fragments of the United Kingdom enjoy the approximate strategic and economic importance of Bangladesh, the government will be seriously buggered if it lifts so much as a little finger to slow the nation’s swift descent into murderous anarchy and economic irrelevance."


#18

since the Lisboa treaty the democratic processes are much much better, the main issues are a rather technocratic commission and the missing right for the parliament to introduce laws.

all in all the EU does imo more good than harm and as the decision making needs to include many different parties the results are compromises. so far often good compromises: everyone is unhappy


#19

Double-plus like.


#20

Well, that’s not very democratic, is it? The people’s voice only matters on specific days of the year? And after that they’re to be ignored?

If people have changed their mind in light of new information, and there was some deception going on during the process, then people should get another shot.

I’ve got some issues with democracy as a governmental system, the whole ‘gotcha moments’ thing is a very big one.