US Senate proves climate change is not caused by humans by voting on it


#1

[Read the post]


#2

This goes right along with establishing the exact decimal value of Pi by voting on it…


#3

#4

By Sean Cockerham, McClatchy Washington Bureau
Posted Jan. 22, 2015, at 6:59 a.m.

old news, but perhaps it’s good that we kick off summer by talking of global warming.


#5

These clowns are supposed to represent US?


#6

They represent the “interests” of the U.S., which excludes non-campaign-funding constituents.


#7

At one level however, this is kind of an identity ticket punch. Those who went on record with this vote as declaring that humans are not causing climate change can point to it with pride when they go back home to pander to there their base.

Those of us with some modicum of conscience and scientific literacy will have to settle for it being a roll call for self-identified idiots.

Edit: strike-through to correct typo.


#8

:“We made a science!” - The Senate


#9

No need to insult clowns like that! Besides, I’m willing to bet that actual clowns could do a better job than these fools.


#10

What I find most grotesque is the blatant lie that humans “can’t change the environment,” which Inhofe appeals to. We have examples on record of human climate change from the Dust Bowl to Beijing. General consensus is that fundamental changes in the Earth’s atmosphere were made early in life’s history by nothing more than microscopic organisms, and yet somehow humans and technology can’t change climate? Again, this isn’t just wrong, it’s a lie. It can be nothing but a lie.

I suppose it’s good that they’re finally admitting that climate change is occurring, but that alone should damn them. The people now saying that climate change is real, but not influenced by human activity are people who spent literally decades denying it was happening at all. How can anyone possibly justify considering these people credible, decades late to the game and consistently wrong (lying) in their previous positions. To me this is what makes climate deniers in the US some of the most deplorable people on Earth right now, because to be honest they must admit that they’ve already been consistently wrong about effectively everything. For such people to then continue to insist that no, against all scientific evidence, they’re still right about this one thing is what’s arrogant. And stupid. And dishonest.


#11

Can we add genocidal to that list?


#12

I would much rather have a panel of scientists responsible for passing laws than this.


#13

From the article, it sounds like they voted 50-49 to accept the scientific consensus… It failed because it needed more than 50% to pass, so you can technically say they voted to reject it, but that’s worded a bit confusingly with the higher number of votes being positive.

They even got five Republicans to vote for it, so… progress? If only there had been another ten willing.


#14

Here is the list of Senators that voted against this amendment

And the text of the amendment

       (a) Findings.--The environmental analysis contained in the 
     Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement referred to 
     in section 2(a) and deemed to satisfy the requirements of the 
     National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (42 U.S.C. 4321 et 
     seq.) as described in section 2(a), states that--
       (1) ``[W]arming of the climate system is unequivocal and 
     each of the last [3] decades has been successively warmer at 
     the Earth's surface than any preceding decade since 1850.'';
       (2) ``The [Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change], in 
     addition to other institutions, such as the National Research 
     Council and the United States (U.S.) Global Change Research 
     Program (USGCRP), have concluded that it is extremely likely 
     that global increases in atmospheric [greenhouse gas] 
     concentrations and global temperatures are caused by human 
     activities.''; and
       (3) ``A warmer planet causes large-scale changes that 
     reverberate throughout the climate system of the Earth, 
     including higher sea levels, changes in precipitation, and 
     altered weather patterns (e.g. an increase in more extreme 
     weather events).''.
       (b) Sense of Congress.--Consistent with the findings under 
     subsection (a), it is the sense of Congress that--
       (1) climate change is real; and
       (2) human activity significantly contributes to climate 
     change.

#15

Shoot, we could save a hell of a lot of money by ending the funding of scientific research and just having the Senate vote on all scientific theories. Why didn’t we think of this sooner?!


#16

If no other kind of literacy :wink:


#17

Eye herb aye a word youth a pet ants batch fort two day :smiley:


#18

Interestingly Tennessee’s senators split the vote. Lamar Alexander’s concession that climate change is real and caused by humans isn’t going to go over well with the majority of his constituents. I could say we’ve made progress since the departure of Frist, but that would be damning with faint praise.


#19

The way we write laws these days is so obtuse as to be laughable. The attempt to divide the tutored from the masses is transparent.


#20

The funny bit is that the workable strategies for dealing with climate change will mostly be the same, regardless of what the original causes were.