Vatican spells Jesus wrong on commemorative coin


#1

[Permalink]


#2

Awesome, I'm going to head right down to the Temple and see if I can score one of the flawed medallions from the moneychangers there! It's sure to be a sought-after collectible, and the odds that some crazed fundamentalist with a whip will interfere are vanishingly small.


#3

Conclusive proof that THERE IS NO GOD!

Or that he's illiterate.


#4

Lesus Christ! The oblect of a coin like that is to celebrate the loy of inlecting new leadership into one of the world's malor religions. I guess it's lust another example of the difficulty of telling the difference between l and l in sans-serif fonts.


#5

Yet another reason typefaces should have a clear distinction between L and I.


#6

1 agree.


#7

I can only surmise that person after person looked at this and simply shrugged, "Huh, I guess that's another obscure, wacky Latin thing I haven't heard of," and just passed it along.

Would they actually have been looking for "Iesus" and not "Jesus" ? The article is unclear.


#8

IHS is reasonably common in Roman Catholic circles


#9

But Jehovah starts with an I!


#10

Christ, what an accident!


#11

Now I don't feel nearly as stupid for the commemorative coins I accidentally put out celebrating the "Lying Spaghetti Monster".


#12

Chris, what an asshole! wink


#13

Where's your miracles now big shot.


#14

I love you smile


#15

As is INRI


#16

It's worth noting that this is a classic problem in letterpress shops -- if you get careless and forget that the letters should be reading backward it's easy to substitute b for d, p for q, and so on. L for J, or I for either, is another case of the same thing.

It could be worse. Gothic fonts are notorious for having capital letters that are hard to read, leading to things like the "Saint Ioseph Gazette" going for two decades before someone noticed that the J had turned into an I.

The real question is: Do they take the solution the Post Office does when defective stamps escape, and crank out a bunch of equally defective ones to kill the unintended collectors' value and avoid the temptation for staff to sell additional "rare" copies under the table at hugely inflated prices, or do they think they can recover enough to keep that from becoming an issue? Depends, I suppose, on how incorruptable they think everyone they're working with will be.


#17

Such is the result of no longer teaching latin in the schools.


#18

Any scholars here? Is there not some possibility that this was a deliberate slight by the anti-Jesuit branch of the much fragmented vatican religgion? Some obscure reference to a muslim spelling of Jebus?

Please? A little infighting would make my day.

That said, this pope does seem a bit better than Ratzslinger. I still want him to actualy allow all the paedos to go to jail. And all the horrible administrators who facilitated their evasions. And all the senior hierarchy who ignored the inconceivable multiplicity of assaults on minors.


#19

The script on the coin shows all the Us as Vs - PVBLICANVM, QVIAM, SEQVERE and so on. In that case, they would not distinguish between I and J either, and so should write IESUS.


#20

No, that makes no sense at all. Jesus is Iesus in Latin, Iesous in Greek, something similar in Aramaic, but it never ever starts with an L. Doesn't matter if you're Muslim or Rastafarian, there's no Lesus - it's a typo.