Venezuelan government hopes eating rabbits will ease food crisis


#21

pat pat - “Yes, dear. That’s what that means. No go play while we make dinner.”


#22

This just in from Australia: “What could possibly go wrong?”


#23

Just import a group of starving Venezuelans and your rabbit problem will be gone…


#24

Lol @ “socialist stronghold”


#25

I worked well in Octavia Butlers “Parable of the Sowers” so should work well in any post-apocalyptic setting


#26

“All the world will be your enemy, Prince of a Thousand enemies. And when they catch you, they will kill you. But first they must catch you; digger, listener, runner, Prince with the swift warning. Be cunning, and full of tricks, and your people will never be destroyed.”


#28

No True Scotsman!


#29

Socialism is about seeing to the needs of each citizen; north korea is about the nation’s leadership gratifying themselves by objectifying the populace.

Any pretense of civility is just that, a fig leaf for the inaction of greater global powers.


#30

Then you’d love it. Darker and greasier than duck. Wild is at least


#31

Interesting article, once I got past the glaring mistake of calling a country Chinese plutocrats use for slave labor a socialist stronghold. :face_with_raised_eyebrow:

Sorry, but the corollary to the No True Scotsman fallacy isn’t that everyone is a Scotsman.


#32

1


#33

The problem is not so much with the specifics of the advice(I don’t know if it’s actually a good idea or not; but ‘suggest livestock type’ is pretty standard agricultural extension fare; and certainly no campier than The Chicken of Tomorrow); but with the context.

“Crash program to bring large numbers of non agricultural workers into the agricultural sector on short notice because we are running out of food”, though, is a very, very, bad sign.

If you are running out of food; that suggests that there is something going badly wrong with your existing agricultural sector and/or supply of imports; which is exactly the sort of situation where getting good results from inexperienced people who currently lack any agriculture related capital goods isn’t going to be very effective. Any sort of agricultural activity takes skill and experience; and actually generating a decent surplus(and avoiding periodic famine) has been a real challenge for much of the history of civilization. If your agricultural specialists can’t do it because things are falling apart; do you think the influx of noobs is going to solve the problem?


#34

“You’ve read the book, you’ve seen the film - now try the stew!”
(NTNOCN joke about Watership Down)


#35

I’ve had some very oily rabbit, but the wild ones do tend to be super lean.

Such a shame. Quail are another.

they can eat the excess kangaroo while they are at it. i find kangaroo a bit dry, but delicious none the less, i usually mix it with lamb or an oiler meat when making burgers patties from it. kangaroo are difficult to manage and prevent from overpopulating from a DOW perspective, they are pretty much deer that breed like rabbits.

i agree in part, depends on the reason for the existing failure.

i think part of their and many countries problems is a symptom of globalization, where large agricultural exports more than a fair share of what is being produced, screwing the local in country market. small producers are more likely to keep whatever they produce in country to feed the people around them.


#36

The only operable yardstick on BB seems to be that if something sold as socialism is largely functional (e.g., Denmark, the British NHS) we get to call it socialism. If something sold as socialism fails (e.g., Venezuela, the USSR) calling it socialism is somehow off limits. One may well decide to run the risk of what a socialist revolution or movement might bring, but the notion that if it breaks bad, then it doesn’t count?

North Korea is explicitly something other than socialism, I agree. It’s Juche. And there’s a lot of socialist elements to it, but it’s not a yardstick for much. But Venezuela? Not sure how that gets to shake the label.

(Lovely to read today that Maduro’s VP used to be head of the Venezuela Ba’ath movement, which is a weird, weird political cross-over)


#37

Wonderful “deep cut” reference!


#38

I must have missed that in the community guidelines. /s

I call socialism socialism, and have no control over what you or anyone else call socialism. I’m glad we can agree NK is not socialist.

Venezuela actually has some real socialist elements, albeit deeply corrupted and twisted by juntas and dictators. But you were replying to @Blaze_Curry’s reply to the article posted by @Woodchuck45 which described North Korea, not Venezuela, as a socialist stronghold. So, two different things.


#39

'Because your first example is of democratic nations while your second one is of dictatorships.

You miss the important factor here, its political freedom. Dictatorships are inherently damaging to economies. They breed endemic and systemic corruption, require constant conflict (either real or perceived), and waste resources as a matter of course.Even fascist (purely capitalistic) dictatorships are economically unstable by nature and prone to famine and collapse. Socialism appears to be largely successful in countries with a great deal of political freedom but not so much where it does not.


#40

That’s an issue of some debate.


#41

It’s the soylent green business model…