What everyone earns working on a $200m blockbuster


#1

[Read the post]


#2

Not bad at all! I saw one of these a few weeks ago, for the anime industry, and the numbers were a LOT smaller. The director might have a middle-class job, but a lot of the gofers and technicians are going to need a side job.


#3

I’d like to see that on a per hour-worked basis too.


#4

Considering that a lot of the high paying jobs could take years to complete, and LA is damn expensive, it doesn’t look that insane. And while it seems a little overkill to have say, six drivers, in the long run its probably better than letting Tom Cruise drive himself.


#5

It keeps him from bringing the Dianetics books to the set.


#6

And that, my dear friends, is why I turned down the role for Day Player #26.


#7

Keeping in mind that “Driver” is likely to be trucks getting gear and crew to and from locations as well, half a dozen seems modest.

I was disappointed we didn’t see chattels, rentals, & equipment as well, (or permits, licensing, catering and travel for that matter) to add to the balance. The notes attached to it on Youtube note that “non-human costs” were excluded, but I think they would be just as interesting, in a way.


#8

Oh sure, even with all the data there it is still a little opaque. I guess my gut feeling is, “$200m to employ that many people, on wages that aren’t too bad, and the investors still make money? I’m okay with that.”. Honestly that’s the kind of capitalism I like.


#9

Can i get that in bulleted list format please?


#10

They’re prop guns. They use blanks.


#11

The kind where the accountants write off fictional substantial losses to decrease the amount of taxes they pay?


#12

What’s the timeline for something like this, though?


#13

The numbers for the VFX crew are wildly, hilariously, inaccurate.


#14

You mean you wouldn’t want the cars to be on…

#Cruise control?

No. I’ll show myself out, thank you.


#15

Weirdly, I’m drawn to the notion of the Property Master making $250K. I trust it’s an exceedingly complicated job, but to be the guy in charge of making sure all our stuff is there, you probably spend fairly little time behind a desk. You probably get to be snarky about awful Hollywood stars, but get along with the cool ones. Seems like a good gig.


#16

This right here caught my eye as a likely error:

I mean, sure, maybe one of the apprentices is working two full years on the gig, but otherwise no way are they making close to what the union assistant is making.


#17

Yep. If a show involves any substantial location shooting, you’d need drivers for each of these trucks: camera truck, grip truck, electric truck, props/set dressing 5-ton, honeywagon, FX truck, wardrobe truck, a couple of stakebeds to haul cast/director/hair & makeup trailers (and probably a fuel truck as well), and a production van or three to haul cast and crew back and forth between base camp and set.

The Mentalist was a TV show rather than a $200 million feature, but in the last season we employed seventeen drivers, not counting day players.


#18

From a typical Mentalist call sheet:


#19

Another error, but just a typo.


#20

I saw this the other day as well and thought it was quite interesting but it obviously leaves out a big part of the picture and that’s how long it took to earn that amount and what the hourly rate was. You may see three different positions earning $100k but the amount of work could be 15 minutes for a well known actor that just happened to be working in the sound stage next door making a guest appearance versus 2 years for a VFX guy.

As much as I enjoyed this it just left me wanting for more!