What it's really like to read lips


#1

[Read the post]


#2

sometimes I test myself with the TV on mute. I have the same problems, but I figured there were work-arounds that are taught. guess not; or it seems they’re not as effective as I imagined them to be. Still, practice and necessity must reward a genuine lip reader far better than my half-assed attempts, though.


#3

Is this a Whitey Ford song?

It’s a skill both ways, dog.


#4

Why can’t I read lips ? It’s frustrating - I have never been able to do it.


#5

I’m hard of hearing to where I now need electronic doodads. Since then m only in my 40s I resisted this for years and inadvertently learned to compensate by watching people’s mouths when they talk. I can’t get a whole conversation that way but can get the gist.


#6

#7

judging by your avatar, we were both DJs? I had a monitor in my face and headphones on blast several times a week all through my 20s and 30s. my hearing was never great to start with, but I reckon I’m not far behind you. bring on the elecrtronic doo-dads! with the stuff they have now, it seems that now is the best time in history to be hard-of-hearing.


#8

DJ , producer, recording/mixing engineer, bassist in punk rank bands & lord only knows how many events right in front of the speakers, etc going back to the early 80s. That plus bad genetics on my moms side where the males lose hearing early.

I got my hearing aids from Costco. Kirkland rebadged made by ReSound. Quite happy with them.


#9

What a great short film. It’s entries like this that originally brought me to Boing Boing as a "directory of wonderful things ".


#10

Lynx with bluetooth? That’s what I’ve got, and find the integration with my iPhone to be kind of useful, but not as good as it could be.


#11

I didnt get the bluetooth model, the ones just below that.


#12

I guess I must have doodads in my future because that’s exactly what I’m doing. Hearing damage from playing live shows & band practice in metal storage sheds for over a decade. I get the majority via visual queues- particularly when in crowded spaces or times where there is crosstalk. When I can’t see the persons mouth & there is crosstalk, I get nothing. Depending on how audio is mixed I even have to go to CC with the telly.


#13

That first part was the flashing red light for me but it still took me years to admit the problem. Unfortunately even with doodads I still have trouble about tv and movie mixes where vocal tracks get buried in the mix too often.


#14

I hate how movies are mixed. In order to hear the audio half the time you have to have it turned up loud enough that you get blasted with any other sounds. And I have normal hearing! It’s tough when you want to keep sound down so that you don’t damage your hearing or wake a baby. I grew up with CC since my dad is deaf (he lip reads, doesn’t sign, but has 90% loss since his late teens), so I just use that all of the time. I’ve gotten some of my friends into using it too. It makes watching movies more enjoyable because you can handle having the sound down for the loud parts. Once people get over the oh my gosh something different factor, it really is a great thing!


#15

CC here would be in Japanese and I don’t read that fast. For DVDs & BDs I sometimes just turn on subtitles


#16

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