Why did this cop smash this woman in the face during the Arizona "riot"?

Technically speaking Mr. Canada, that is not a soldier; that was a police officer. A soldier is an individual of the military and is not allowed to intervene in civilian or state issues; Unless they are a national guard, then their intervention has to be decreed by the Gov. of said state.

And you wonder why the founding fathers wrote the 2nd amendment. Pay attention my friends, pay attention.

Being civil is one thing. That was defensible.

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Can’t watch the vid because YouTube removed it at the request of “Fullscreen Inc”, who is behind “Fullscreen Inc”?

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What’s even more suspicious is they had JUST gone through training for this sort of “riot”.

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If you listen very carefully, you can hear a very faint buzz in the background – I can only assume that he was fulfilling his duty to protect and serve by protecting her from a bee or some similar threat.

  1. Unless he was borrowing someone else’s badge or had electrical tape over the number.

Thank you Phil Ochs. 'Cept now they don’t even bother with that Knock on the Door.

In many a time, in many a land
With many a gun in many a hand
They came by the night, they came by the day
Came with their guns to take us away

With a knock on the door, knock on the door
Here they come to take one more, one more

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Hate to break the news to you, but this scene was WAAAAY too much like a flashback to the fall of '70 in Tucson for me. So reconsider that “30 years” thing.

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Fullscreen equips content creators and brands with technology tools,
premium services and strategic consultation for audience development and
innovative brand solutions on YouTube.
Fullscreen’s current clients include NBCUniversal, FOX, FremantleMedia, JASH, WIGS and more.

They claim to ‘help new channels and networks thrive’ and ‘build audience and engagement’. I’d say they’re doing it wrong.

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Make that about 40 years ago. The militarization of American policing started as the Vietnam War was winding down just like the war against cannabis began as Prohibition was ending.

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Actually, this is pretty much like the police 30+ years ago, too. If anything there’s been substantial improvements in accountability and a softer approach by many but not all police forces. What’s really changed is that there are now a few police forces that don’t act like this that present a contrast and (rightfully) raise our expectations. 30 or 40 years ago, this was pretty much standard operating procedure. What may be different is that more police have better protective gear now, so they’re more willing to wade into large conflicts that they used to hold back from. But that just meant, 30 years ago, that the police were going after softer targets (smaller groups, unarmed minorities, etc), not that they weren’t routinely smashing heads. But probably the far bigger change: there are more cameras capturing these events. Police used to be able to act with impunity without the expectation of being filmed, and most brutality simply wasn’t reported. Now we have both blogs and ubiquitous cameras, so we get to see most such events.

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“This video is no longer available due to a copyright claim by Fullscreen, Inc…”

Choose the likely circumstance:

  1. The usual fake copyright claims

  2. A fake copyright claim by the police or police union to “defuse the situation.”

  3. Fullscreen, Inc.really owns the copyright

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Have some mirrors, while they last:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eF9wnATIpxg

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6KAzJ5Laf9U

http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=d02_1396299230

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[citation needed]

Up until fairly recently Posse Comitatus kept that as an important distinction. But the Military has gotten increasingly involved in drug enforcement and anti-terrorism, and as of 2006, Posse Comitatus was essentially abolished. Ad it to the list of noble sounding latin terms (along with Habeas Corpus) that many people think are in force, but actually are not.

Police, Soldiers- they’re both uniformed armed forces that don’t answer to the likes of you and me. A distinction without a difference.

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I wonder if we could get all (or at least a significant majority) of those hypothetical “awesome cops” to stand up, en masse, and call bullshit on the behavior of their asshole thug colleagues.

I’m not holding my breath.

Institutions are made up of individuals. All it takes for bad cops to be the norm is for good cops to do nothing.

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Dude, that was obviously someone’s OPINION on the matter. He wasn’t trying to lay down fact, exactly, but rather explained his perception of what happened and why.

Your “citation needed” is completely unnecessary and adds nothing to the discussion.

But are you aware that they had only recently stopped training on this very sort of “riot”? It’s all very suspicious.

And I won’t leave a citation BECAUSE IT IS AN OPINION.

Because no undeground group has started exacting payback for police transgressions in any kind of organized manner. I’m not advocating it (mostly for fear or repercussions) but does anyone honestly believe that out of control police agencies are going to stop until some group starts to terrorize them back? I mean why would they stop? Cops shops that are like this have no civilian oversight or have a habit of only attacking powerless citizens and those engaged in policing the police are vested with the seat of power (look at Sheriff Joe, who has the complicity of the racist seniors in his county and has thus far told the feds to go screw).

Until the filth is treated like they treat us, literally, they won’t stop. If it’s true of one terrorist group it’s true of them all.

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Yes, because clearly when a police officer assaults someone violently, we shouldn’t strive to enforce appropriate action through law, but rather we should just shoot them.

You cite a legal document in defense of ignoring legal due process in favor of meting out retributive violence. Methinks you are confused. If the legal system doesn’t work properly, if the cops fail to get held accountable, the answer is to fix the legal system - not shoot people.

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Take a deep breath, there’s no need to shout.

But are you aware that they had only recently stopped training on this very sort of “riot”? It’s all very suspicious.

I was aware. And so was anyone else who read the student newspaper. http://www.wildcat.arizona.edu/article/2014/03/police-prepare-for-possible-riots-over-ncaa-championships. There’s no conspiracy here, just an asshole on the force using excessive force for the situation.