Why Hillary Clinton's DNC speech was 'a moon landing' for women


#27

Smart lady.


#28

I just thought it was really impressive that she was able to hold her own when she had to follow some amazingly good speakers. That takes some skill.

I don’t think the fact that she’s a woman is as big a deal except as a symbolic thing. Very few politicians are anything like typical people and their issues aren’t representative of ours. I don’t expect we’ll suddenly see income equality for women when she gets elected any more than we saw racism go away when Obama got elected.

It’s still neat though, and it gives me more hope for our first transgender Atheist bio-hacker president with a Polynesian Hell’s Angel VP pick.


#29

What? Didn’t you hear all those times he said “Cop lives don’t matter,” and “kill whitey?” You must be watching the lamestream media.


#30

I have always been fond of manx!


#31

Really? You think it’s “odd”?

Oh, well then. Of course. Because if you think it’s odd, it couldn’t possibly be an intrinsic good after all. Apparently the rest of us are just confused.


#32

I think that’s a classic example of somebody adopting the very same logic that they set out to combat in the first place: that we should consider somebody’s gender before we consider their actual suitability for a position.


#33

The primary voters and delegates considered her actual suitability for the position.

Now that it’s happened, we celebrate the gender aspect.


#34

I was kinda expressing something in the realm of a subjective opinion.


#35

I was going to say this. Guess I don’t have to, now.


#36

It sounds like you are asking women and their supporters who are excited about seeing a competent woman nominated for president not to celebrate because they have been marginalized in the past. Thanks.


#37

Fair enough. I guess my position is based on strong personal political objections to Hilary Clinton, but I appreciate that I’m probably just sounding like an ass so I’m going to sign out. Enjoy!


#38

I realized a while ago that while Clinton is not my first pick as a candidate, her being elected president would have extremely positive spiritual ramifications that go beyond policies and what occurs over a single presidential term. I can deal with her, and I can go farther and embrace her not because of who she is, but because every little girl in America who grows up moving forward will no longer grow up in a world where every president has been a man. That alone is worth supporting her. The fact that she’s sane, and probably will incrementally make the world a better place, but it well over the edge for me. Her win will be a Very Good Thing.

Edit: For the record, I’m a man by birth, and to me the above is beyond obvious.


#39

On a symbolic level, this is a Big Deal. Just as watching a black man swear the oath of office made me wonder what the new limits were, I get it. The ultimate glass ceiling.

It may serve to our advantage, a gauge to see how that 70 cents on the dollar ration looks in 4 years. Will women be better off in America after 4 years of Clinton? Possibly not, but we’ll all be better informed about it in any case, I think.

When Obama invited the white cop and the black professor to the white house to share a beer, I dared to hope it marked an improvement in race relations. #blacklivesmatter served to disillusion me of that idea. But having a black president has served to dramatize these problems in a way we couldn’t have imagined before. If she stirs up a misogynist backlash equivalent\ to the racist backlash Obama prompted, we are all in for a helluva ride.

I wouldn’t call this the moon landing, not yet. The spacecraft is healthy and leaving toward the moon. (even if democracy is not!) It’ll feel like the moon landing when she swears her oath of office on that bible.

And as great as that will feel, we still have a shitstorm of real problems to work through, that she represents an obstacle to, rather than an ally.


#40

Not really the latter either; all her opponents dropped out of the running.

I dunno. Nefertiti? Cleopatra? Dido of Carthage? Arsinoe? Zenobia?


#41

What, no Boudica?


#42

In fairness, I was replying to somebody who said their suitability was a separate and unrelated issue.


#43

The fact that this means so much to many women I care about matters to me.


#44

Yes, but wasn’t the bodacious Boudica in the UK?


#45

Was Ireland part of the UK at that time?

Hell, did the UK as we now know it even exist back then?


#46

Not Hillary, but one of my favorite quotes:

When Ruth Bader Ginsburg was asked when there will be enough women on the Supreme Court:
“And my answer is when there are nine,” she said, as if the question even needed to be asked.