Will augmented reality be quite this unpleasant?


#1

[Read the post]


#2

This is the example of this I remember.

Heh. Same guy, 6 years ago.


#3

You won’t have to have all overlays enabled, and if popup, ad blockers are any indication of what people will do control of the overlay is going to be very important


#4

Thank God I’m Amish.


#5

So that’s what Facebook is working on.


#6

This illustrates why Craig Ferguson once said, “Never take LSD and go to a disco.”


#7

I had the impression that Tokyo was pretty much like that already; no augmentation necessary.


#8

I suspect that the answer is ‘no’; but only because it will be worse in ways that an obnoxious Stanford drop-out has not yet received billions in VC cash for inventing and inflicting on a massive scale.

This ‘augmented reality’ stuff seems like one of those areas(like parasitology) where mere predictive pessimism isn’t really adequate for the task because the reality is always more chillingly creative than you give it credit for, even when you keep that in mind.


#9

My wife got a Gear 2 smartwatch free with her latest phone upgrade, and I’ve been running with it a couple of times. I like it a lot as a stop-watch (though that’s an expensive stopwatch…and the battery life suuuuuucks, from 100% to low 20%s after a 30min run listening to music through bluetooth headphones). The un-uninstallable “health tracker” app that I have no interest in kept popping up in the middle of my runs, flashing and congratulating me, despite the fact that I’d never started a session on the app. I had to navigate through the pretty weird UI to find my timer again just to catch my next 1/2 mile lap. It was enough to send me into cranky old “no more future for me, thanks” mode. I eventually found the setting to turn off that notification, but you can’t uninstall the app, or turn it off completely. You are definitely right, the future better come with settings.


#10

With the Forces of Advertising arrayed against ad blockers as they are today, I wouldn’t bet money on the same controls being in place.

You are not a person, you are a surprisingly stubborn repository of revenue.


#11

There will be an overlay for that.


#12

The “Amish overlay” is also a sex position. True story.


#13

And we still won’t be safe from Comic Sans :anguished:


#14

You really think it will be that neat and tidy? That the pop ups will go away with just a little click or swipe? It’s going to much worse for your average person who can’t afford to pay to make that crap go away.


#15

On the contrary, the blocking of browsers with ad blockers has demonstrated one thing: If you try to force an unpleasant experience in exchange for content, people will stay away. There can always be a competing AR company that markets itself as having a more pleasant experience.

Plus browser ads are rarely a personal safety issue. Intrusive AR ads while you’re walking a city street or driving ARE. The government will step in to regulate it after a few people take the windshield taste test.

It’s be worse for the poor, of course. Think of Android - where apps make far less sale revenue than iPhones - and make up for it with more in-app advertising.


#16

“Incoming call: Inspiration Guru”
(Takes off VR glasses, steps on them, pulls out phone, blocks ‘Inspiration Guru,’ removes from address book.)


#17

"Will web browsing be quite this unpleasant?"


The headline is asking the same question about AR, using an example no more realistic. The answer is “no.”


#18

waiting for ‘total conversions’ eg Victorian England (Whitechaple Rose by Lorelei Shannon)


#19

Victorian England as experienced by wealthy Victorians.


#20

Ve haf vays of making you shop…