Woman beaten by CHP cop to receive $1.5 million


#1

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#2

Can’t wait for the day these settlements start coming out of police pensions instead of tax payer dollars.


#3

Topic should be merged with <a href=“http://bbs.boingboing.net/t/update-to-the-l-a-roadside-beating-of-woman-by-chp-settlement/41693"target=”_blank">existing topic.


#4

Somehow the idea that the cops shouldn’t abuse people never makes it down to the “Thin Blue Line.”


#5

Thank goodness for the guy with the camera that captured this horrific abuse. I’m glad this settlement was reached quickly and I hope it helps Ms. Pinnock out of homelessness.


#6

Unfortunately, the pensions ultimately come from the taxpayers anyway.

I too want to see more cases where the cop loses his job and spends some time in prison. I want the pain of the settlements to be felt by the officers on the force and not to be just another line item in next year’s budget.

Maybe if it were structured as a bonus… a carrot instead of a stick. Sort of like a profit sharing bonus in private enterprise.

Let there be a fund established for each law enforcement agency, set aside for paying settlements to victims of police violence. In each year where no settlements were paid, let there be a bonus to all of the officers on the force.

That might give officers incentive to keep their fists to themselves, and more importantly, to rein in and weed out their more violent colleagues.


#7

Reason number 426 why we need to have better mental heath institutions. This woman needed help and looks like she’ll get it now, I wish the state would do the math and see that mental health institutions are cheaper than dealing the after effects.


#8

Slightly tangential and meta, but I had to look up CHP.

Not really complaining, per se - I know that a lot of Boingers are Californians, so the acronym seems obvious to them - but if you’re going to mention an acronym for a regional organization three different times in your article, good form suggests you should spell it out in full at least once for clarity.


#9

Realistically, it’ll just give them more incentive to shut down anyone who tries pointing a camera at them.


#10

I’m guessing you’re young, but either way, Erik Estrada1 is somewhere crying by himself in the dark.


#11

CHP: Combined Heat and Power


#12

Sadly, you may be right.


#13

Why do the anchor-persons in the news clip keep referring to this as a “confrontation”? It is clearly and without ambiguity an assault that is shown in the video. I’m not being pedantic, but language is everything. Watch the clip again, and use your imagination to replace every instance of “confrontation” with the word “assault”. The reportage takes on an entirely different meaning and emotion.


#14

I am sure there are gonna be lotsa people willing to take the money burden of her shoulders. I wonder how will she navigate around that…


#15

Clubbing, Hitting, & Punching


#16

The majority of the settlement will be structured as a special needs trust, per one of the linked articles. She has family, and presumably they will help her avoid being conned or cheated.


#17

good for her!


#18

Lizard-enabling bastards, that’s why.


#19

I was more of a MAS*H guy, if we’re going for 70s television with acronyms for names. :wink:

And let’s be frank - acronyms and the names they represent tend to change a lot in 40 years, as directly evidenced by the (admittedly slight) difference between CHiP and CHP. Almost the same exact same thing, but still different enough that the link between them honestly didn’t occur to me at first - for all I knew, the current form of the acronym had ended up far more wildly removed than it actually is.

A lot of Californians seem to have the bad habit of provincialism. They talk on a national scale about local institutions as if everyone in the nation is intimately familiar with what the BART is, or what the CDE is, or the CHCF, or the CYA, or the SETC, et cetera.

Dropping “CHP” with only the vague context of “something to do with the police, somewhere around Los Angeles” is like mentioning the “CSAC” with only the context of “student debt and rising California tuitions”.

Sure, a non-Californian reader (or even merely a Californian one not familiar with the acryonym) can take a moment and deduce what is being talked about from that context, or stop and look it up, but for best clarity and least annoyance it should just be spelled out in the article.

(And if Erik Estrada is crying by himself in the dark, it’s because he’s remembered for CHiPs more than anything else. :smile:)


#20

It’s not just Californians that do this. All those teen romp movies I watched as a teen referred to a place called DMV where kids got their driver’s license. I lived in states where you went to the DOT to do that. Now I live in a state, where rather confusingly, you go to the SOS.

Are you saying CYA has a meaning other than Cover Your Ass??