116 years of stop-motion animation in 3 minutes


#1

Originally published at: http://boingboing.net/2016/09/02/116-years-of-stop-motion-anima.html


#2

Wow…


#3

What, no Kihachirō Kawamoto ? Tsk.

I’m a little ambivalent on Kubo and the Two Strings – an excellent technical accomplishment, but the Americanized banter in the script kinda killed the immersion for me. Maybe I’ve just gotten too used to seeing that sort of thing with subtitles in one foreign language or another. It did make me want to catch up on Paranorman and The Boxtrolls, though. (Coraline, at least, is effing awesome and I can recommend it with no reservations, even in light of the fact that it was based on a book.)


#4

Also basically a beat-for-beat remake of Mirrormask, but with better execution. (Hey, it’s Gaiman’s source material, he can take as many stabs at it as he wants.)


#5

The editor of this piece mentions in the comments that there were lots of sources they had to cut due to pacing and emotional feel they wanted to portray in this piece. You will notice a lack of Brothers Quay as well.


#6

I absolutely second this. Saw it on Wed, and the acting and script were…lukewarm. Not terrible, just “meh”. The visuals, however, were incredible. Totally blew me away. Found this great behind-the-scenes compilation, and was so impressed at the scale and detail of the production. Loved the music as well, and definitely got hit a couple times in the emotion bone.


#7

I agree on Kubo. It seemed decidedly un-Japanese in a lot of ways. And I’m not even Japanese myself. Neither were most of the actors, and there was an intentional effort not to use Japanese terms except “origami” and “samurai” since those are household American words. Nobody ever says “shamisen” and Bon is merely “the festival” and so on.

http://www.downlikejtown.com/first/2016/8/25/kubo-is-complicated

Still, it is visually astonishingly gorgeous and musically fantastic and the story is fun, and I’ve seen it twice and will be picking up the Blu-Ray to gawk at it. I would rank Laika movies thusly:

Corpse Bride > Kubo > Coraline > ParaNorman > Boxtrolls


#8

Kubo was really great right up to about the last 1/3. Then the story got so confusing and overly “epic.” It seemed like a cop out. Something something love is the greatest force in the world. I felt it lost the cohesiveness of the story.

There were a lot of really innovative elements in it, though, and the story overall felt fresh.

Visually it was amazing.

Coraline was totally fantastic and one of my fave animated films of all time.


#9

The Adventures of Prince Achmed don’t count as stop-motion animation?


#10

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