74% of Whitesboro voters support racism


#1

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#2

Well, maybe what they’re really saying is “why pretend this isn’t an accurate representation of how this country was founded?”

In other words, they have offered to be America’s badge of shame, instead of burying their heads in the sand.

One could hope, anyway.


#3

That is a positive and lovely way to think of it.


#4

This is a joke, right?


#5

White privilege you know. We need to be reminded that we stole this land from others in the name of Jesus!!


#6

Maybe the next vote, now that the logo will be kept, should be on whether it should be altered. It could be changed to look more like wrestling. And less like strangling.


#7

next vote: change the town name to DoucheVill


#8

I’m hoping Banksy will show up and change the sign so one guy is a clown and the other guy is an alien.

Or maybe Hulk Hogan vs. Iron Sheik.


#9

I still say it’s a crap drawing, but really I don’t find this offensive once you know the context. And like I said before, the story behind it showed how there were a lot of examples of settlers and Native Americans living near each other and respecting each other.

Also - it isn’t “racist”. Man that word gets thrown around so much it is no wonder people have become numb to it.


#10

I had no idea Parks & Recreation were that close to reality…


#11

So would you have voted to change it or keep it? Knowing that it even at the best looks like a white guy beating a Native American and is definitely controversial?

Also, kind of ugly.

I’m thinking it takes a slightly special mindset to say ‘no, we must keep it because this specific image is more important to me than making it something else’


#12

It looks racist and that’s close enough, we don’t need so stinkin’ facts or context. Where’s my pitchfork?


#13

Seals and arms and flags are often described in words, and then rendered by an artist who interprets the words. If seal of Whitesboro is described as depicting a sort of wrestling, then a better artist can be commissioned to make that clear.


#14

But why would somebody insist on ‘White guy defeating a Native American’ seal? Or even ‘White guy wrestling one’?

SUPER CREEPY unless they’re including the other three village people.


#15

I think you’ll find that given enough motive, the concept of context can be described as a sort of hegemonic privilege,


#16

It is nice so many white guys are here to explain the seal isn’t racist. I don’t suppose anybody has asked an Indian?


#17

a colorful event in local Whitesboro history, memorialized on the seal. Local history is full of such anecdotes.


#18

Why would you assume that?


#19

You’re not really answering the question. Just because there’s local history of a guy getting caught i an incriminating position with his horse doesn’t mean it should be on the seal. Should it be okay for a southern town to have slave beatings on their seal? Is that the ONLY thing they can have on their seal? Is it super-important to their local culture and are local Native Americans in support of it?

The question isn’t ‘how can you rationalize it?’. The question is 'why cling to it when there are obviously good reasons not to do so?'


#20

As I said in the other thread, I would either get an artist to make a much better, historically accurate drawing that looks like wrestling, or alter it to maybe a post match hand/arm clasp “good match” sort of imagery.

Though if you look at old state seals, many were drawn by people with little artistic talent…

What’s Rob Leifeld doing?