New York village to keep seal depicting man choking Native American


#1

[Read the post]


#2

I didn’t know it was possible to choke a person by pressing down on the scapula. Hmm. I guess I really do learn something new every day.


#3

I can see how people would jump to offence, but if both dudes were white 90% of the people would think it depicted manly man wrestling which it does.


#4


#5

Both dudes are not white. That’s kind of the point here.


#6

I think an earlier post mentioned that that’s the new version of the logo, where they’re wrestling. The old version was choking.


#7

Oh god, that AP hack is not doing proper justice to the Whitesboro website, which I think can only be described as white supremacist settler fanfiction.

HUGH WHITE - FOUNDER: When Hugh White settled at White’s Town in the county of Montgomery, his settlement marked the commencement of an epoch in our state history as distinct in it’s relation to the past New England influence and Dutch settlement impressed upon us from the Hudson Valley. His settlement marked the beginning of a migration and memories of days of pioneering in New York State. The town was named after Hugh White of Middleton, Connecticut, who, with his five sons, on June 5, 1784 had taken possession of his interest in a patent, which he and others had purchased at public sale in the attainder for treason of Hugh Wallace. Less than two hundred white inhabitants were to be found in White’s Town when it was established in 1788, and this count included traders and prospectors. In the common language of those in New England, who had children or friends who went to settle there, they had gone way up among the Indians in the White’s Town country.

Of Hugh White, a man, a Christian and a citizen, no better conception can be had than the inscription on his tablet in Grand View Cemetery on the hill. “Here sleeps the mortal remains of HUGH WHITE who was born 5th February, 1733, at Middleton in Connecticut, and died April 16th, 1812.” In the year 1784 he moved to Sedauquate, now Whitesborough, where he was the first white inhabitant in the State of New York, west of the German settlements on the Mohawk. He was distinguished for energy, and decision of character, and may be justly regarded as a patriarch, who led the children of New England into the wilderness. As a magistrate, a citizen, and a man, his character for truth and integrity was proverbial. This humble monument of veneration for his memory is reared and inscribed by the affectionate partner of his joys and his sorrows, May 15th, 1826. He lived among the Indians as their friend and the Village Seal depicts a friendly wrestling match that helped foster good relations between White and the Indians. In the publication of the book commemorating the Whitesboro Sesquicentennial 1813-1963, complied by the First Historical Club of Whitesboro, is the Origin of the Village Seal. At the period of the first settlement of Whitestown, the Indian title had not been extinguished to any portion of the country westward of “The line of Property…”.

Most of the Oneida tribe of Indians had maintained their professions of friendship for the white man in an honorable manner. Judge White, as a frontier settler along the Sauquoit Creek, was required to exercise much diplomacy in dealing with his red neighbors. He soon acquired their good will and was fortunate to inspire them with very exalted ideas of his character. An incident that occurred between an Oneida Indian and Hugh White sealed a lasting friendship and confidence. An Oneida Indian of rather athletic form was one day present at the White’s house with several of his companions and at length for fun commenced wrestling. After many trials, the chief became conqueror and he came up to Hugh White and challanged him. White dared not risk being brow beaten by an Indian nor did he want to be called a coward. In early manhood, he had been a wrestler, but of late felt he was out of practice. He felt conscious of personal strength and he concluded that even should he be thrown, that would be the lesser of two evils in the eyes of the Oneida Indians than to acquire the reputation of cowardice by declining. He accepted the challenge, took hold of the Indian and by a fortunate trip, succeeded almost instantly in throwing him. As he saw him falling, in order to prevent another challenge, he fell upon the Indian for an instant and it was some moments before he could rise. When the Indian finally rose, he shrugged his shoulders and was said to have muttered “UGH”, you good fellow too much". Hugh White became a hero in the eyes of the Oneida Indians. This incident made more manifest the respect of the Indian for White. In all ways, White dealt fairly with the Oneida tribe and gained their confidence, which brought about good-will.

They say they have such respect for history but can’t manage to name one native american.

Oh yeah, this is the football mascot too.


#8

If only Whitesboro was home to a real university and was therefore capable of perennially reinterpreting local history instead of relying on the words of an antiquarian or two who resided there once upon a time.


#9

I lived there I’d print stickers with the caption, “I wish I knew how to quit you, Rides With Bear” to deface public property with.


#10

See this is why I will never win the lottery, because that’s exactly the type of history departments I would endow.


#11

Even viewing this in the best possible light and assuming their wrestling story is 100% true and they genuinely don’t mean to be racist… isn’t it still kind of an asshole, braggart move to put your wrestling victory on a village seal for all eternity? How insecure do you need to be to still be saying “nyah nyah, we won” centuries later? And why would it ever be a good idea to keep a seal that can, will and probably should be interpreted as racist, no matter what the true meaning supposedly is? Why is it so important that they’re willing to deal with that stigma forever? The only answer I can see is that they not only are racist, but proudly so.


#12

Pretty sure he said ‘wrastlin,’ though maybe he meant judo. Despite poor form, it looks like someone’s about to get tossed.


#13

I wonder what the budget is for a small town of 3,735 to be spending
money on designing a new seal, and replacing every last thing in town
that bears the seal, just to satisfy a bunch of strangers on the
internet?

Edit: Oops, I didn’t mean to reply to your post specifically.


#14

smooth, dan_smooth. :smiley:


#15

That, plus the screw-you-you-pushy-internet-mob attitude.


#16

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