A new AI tool from Adobe can detect Photoshopped faces

Originally published at: https://boingboing.net/2019/06/14/a-new-ai-tool-from-adobe-can-d.html

We presume it can tell by the pixels.

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This news is going to scare the shit out of Instagram influencers

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Of course Adobe can detect photos that Adobe products have edited.

Software Rating: Meh…

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The jig is up @beschizza

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In other news, Ultrafakers use results of Adobe AI to improve their photo-modification software.

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The tool is even able to suggest how to restore a photo to its original, unedited appearance, though these results are often mixed.

That explains a lot. @beschizza has been beta testing it for a while - the mouth eyes are real, people!

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So using this AI tool from Adobe could theoretically also detect Photoshopped various parts of people’s bodies that have been enhanced or shrunken down to make them look skinnier???

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To create the software, engineers trained a neural network on a database of paired faces, containing images both before and after they’d been edited using Liquify.

So is this a tool to predict photoshopped faces, or to guess which parts of a face are most likely to be photoshopped?

Any what does it think of this lady, “Katie Jones”?

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Well I am hoping it detects her use of the hair color feature because the article refers to her as a “redhead.” Or maybe the author is just colorblind.

Or maybe I am…:smile:

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This is similar to the system allegedly used in that case.

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I’m becoming attached to that “woman’s” face.
Does that mean it’s the future?

Telling him they aren’t real may agitate him… And you really don’t want to agitate him. :thinking:

The thing is, these types of programs will actually improve the AI that makes fake face, or DeepFakes, or any of the rest of them.

Once you can score how well you’re creating the fakes, it’s significantly easier to automatically evolve better programs for creating fakes.

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What the others said.
Begun the clone brush wars have.

Seriously, training an AI to spot fakes and an adversial AI to prevent being spotted when creating fakes could be an interesting game. The results might be very uncanny, given the effect of runaway stats I observed in other optimisation software.

But I regess.

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I imagine a filter to be applied automatically on anything your see on the web, warning about counterfeits. Google would add it standard to Chrome.

You are welcome. Send money to

I’m now wondering whether Adobe already started doing exactly that to release with future Photoshop versions.

I wonder if the Adobe cloud is already deepdreaming of eclectical seep?

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