Antivax GOP Kentucky governor exposed his kids to chickenpox on purpose so they'd get sick

#23

https://ascpt.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1038/sj.clpt.6100407

It goes on and on. There is no difference in incidence of autism in vaccinated and unvaccinated populations.

31 Likes
Our social contract demands people able to be vaccinated get vaccinated
#24

“And I think, why are we forcing kids to get it?" says the man who forced his kids to get the disease.

19 Likes
#25

I had a look at the figures for New Zealand.

Deaths from chicken pox are reported by our Ministry of Health to be around .003% of cases.

1 Like
#26

I never get people’s feeling that they know more about vaccines than infectious disease doctors. Do you get creative with other doctors? Fight with your cardiologist about your heart failure? Do you tell your oncologist that chemotherapy doesn’t work and you should just let the cancer do it’s thing?

It’s just become fashionable to be idiotic about vaccines. But they are way more effective than pretty much anything in medicine, so if you don’t want to take them, don’t plan on seeing a cardiologist or coming to the ER because that stuff is way way less effective.

13 Likes
#27

Antivax GOP Kentucky governor exposed his kids to chickenpox on purpose so they’d get sick

TGOP father of the year award.

7 Likes
#28

In the specific case of the varicella vaccine, the UK’s National Health Service (which is generally well respected, and statistically has better overall health outcomes for its population than we have here in the US) has made the decision not to vaccinate most of their population. They’ve got smart people with access to all the same data and science as the public health experts here in the US. Now, obviously they may have made the wrong call, and the US may have the better policy. But clearly not all doctors are on the same page on this vaccine.

3 Likes
#29

The NHS list antivaxxers as one of the reasons on their own page on the website, and their concern about Shingles isn’t based on any particular data.

#30

I didn’t see any reference to antivaxxers on the varicella section of their website. Perhaps I missed it, do you have a link or quote?

As for the concern about shingles not being based on data, I’m not sure what you mean. There are quite a few published studies in respected medical journals showing a reduction in shingles linked to exogenous boosting of immunity due to chickenpox exposure.


2 Likes
#31

I caught it at a time when others around me were catching it. It was like a rite of passage at the time. It wasn’t that pleasant, I still have scars from it. I was out of school for a couple of weeks, that part I liked.

#32

And here in the UK the NHS doesn’t provide vaccines for it:

I feel as though this story is somewhat hysterical, and seems part of the broader vaccinaton culture war that’s going on over the Atlantic. Fair enough - there’s lots at stake - but it does seem to be inflecting the tone of debates such as this one where suddenly you’re either an anti-vaxer scumbag like the guy in the article or someone who is ok with science.

3 Likes
#33

I should add a caveat - the NHS does provide a vaccine for chicken pox under certain circumstances, but it isn’t included in the general childhood vaccination programme.

1 Like
#34

When I was a kid people used to have Chicken Pox Parties, where everyone whose children hadn’t had it brought them over to get a dose. I had it about 10 years ago in my late '30’s and rather wished I’d had it as a kid.

2 Likes
#35

Sorry but you are making my point: when you go to your cardiologist do you ask him what the blood pressure medication regimen is in the UK? Or would you ask your GI doctor how they treat irritable
Bowel in Sweden?

Nope. Because that would be stupid. Just as stupid as arguing with your doctor (who spent at least 7 miserable years of ass kicking getting trained) to recommend some miracles for you.

Like people really have nothing better to do then argue about vaccine regimens in other countries? Just take the shots. Do something creative. Watch TV. Whatever. Anything is more pleasurable than arguing about vaccines.

It’s just so boring!!! Move on people.

#36

Like seriously, the CDC is actually pretty amazing and the world leader in disease prevention. Who gives a sh1t what they do in Belgium?

#37

I was born in 1971, and it was pretty common practice in my childhood and early adulthood to expose your kids to chicken pox “to get it out of the way”. My older sisters both arranged playdates for their kids when a kid at school got chicken pox. It was a responsible thing you did, so your kids didn’t get chicken pox as adults.

I personally got chicken pox as an adult, at age 20, and it was misery. Super high fever, literally lost a couple of days with no memory, and I still have scars on my face, hands, and arms, from where the pustules broke. I was sick in bed for about ten days.

I sure wish there had been a vaccine before 1995, because that would have been great. And I don’t see any reason for letting your kid get chicken pox when there’s a vaccine for it.

5 Likes
#38

(wrong math, withdrawn)

#39

I have had chicken pox twice. Once as a kid, once as an adult.

The second time, I was visiting by a young cousin, who stayed across the room at best. She still caught it.

There is no lifelong immunity. Someone I know has had it 4 times.

I’m not sure if / how the chicken pox vaccine is better than having had changed chicken pox at avoiding shingles later in life.

1 Like
#40

My parents systematically exposed me to all the common childhood diseases, including chicken pox and mumps.

This was the 1960s, before there were any vaccines for them. I had the available vaccines for polio and so on.

It was thought better to get the disease and becomne immune at a young age, in order to avoid the risk of getting it as a adult.

#41

True- most other European countries, including Norway, Sweden, Denmark and the Netherlands, also choose not to vaccinate against it.

On the other hand, there is an important difference between being someone who has had chickenpox in a country where most people have had it so the ‘‘booster effect’’ the NHS website talks about exists, and being someone who has had it in a country where most people are vaccinated.

#42

Bevin was on Bowling Green radio station WKCT earlier today, and revealed that his kids were “miserable for a few days” after they got chickenpox

you! ASSHOLE! puking in all rainbow-colors doesnt describe my disgust nearly enough.

must be wonderfull to have such a sociopathic father.

2 Likes