Björk talking about her TV (1988)


#1

[Read the post]


#2

I suppose she discharged the CRT first - or maybe that’s how she got her hair?


#3

Every single sentence is full of wonder, poetry, and good advice. “I read the truth, and that’s much better. The scientifical truth. You shouldn’t let poets lie to you.”

I just added it to my kid’s YouTube playlists under “how it is made, old school”.

-jeff


#4

As much as I like her solo stuff, I so, so miss The Sugarcubes. Just last week I had an itch to hear Regina played at an insane volume (which is the only way to hear it), and dug out the CD.


#6

Yah, my first thought as well.
I guess it would’ve been a different post title if she’d been electrocuted by the residual charge, but poking around the insides still had me vaguely on edge. Maybe that Danish book she read explained how to handle the things safely.


#7

I find Einar Örn’s project “Frostbite” interesting also, but released only one disc.


#8

How true that is!


#9

I think that by 1988 televisions were self-discharging their CRTs on power-off… Not that I’d take that chance on faith.


#10


#11

I have loved this video for years but had not noticed she has two watches on before now. Always something new to see. What a masterpiece.


#12

In her own words: Icelanders are “a lot of isolated people who actually know how to control and operate electricity”. Also, her dad was an electrician and her mom a fortuneteller. Her not touching the sparkly bits is inherited, so to speak.


#13

I remember this being an extra on a Sugarcubes dvd that I haven’t watched for ages. Now, I need to dig it out since I vaguely remember other interesting stuff in addition to concert footage


#14

I met Björk backstage at the Warfield Theater in San Francisco in 1998. I’d interviewed her over the phone for a trendy monthly magazine a couple of months earlier, and I took a copy of it with me to the show – it turned out to be my backstage pass, in fact. Homogenic had come out the year before; the show had much of that album’s mix of strings and electronica, and some of the members of an Icelandic choir were part of the band. In the Green Room after the show, everyone was relaxing. Björk was obviously wound up, bouncing around, but when she and I met face to face, she immediately sat down with me, offered me a glass of champagne, and spoke directly about the article, the magazine, and her life in Iceland. She was funny and direct and completely unpretentious – just as approachable and weirdly conversational as you’d hope she would be. I remember feeling like I was having an amazing conversation with someone from another planet. I never forgot that night.


#15

The stuff she was messing with should have been safe - the dangerous part of any CRT is under the ‘suction cup’ attached to the tube - it’ll throw you if you are careless.

That being said considering she took the TV apart with no screwdriver I’m pretty sure the set was ‘prepped’ for her prior to the spot being filmed.


#16

The description of a CRT’s operation makes for a much more interesting story than that of a modern display… it would have been great if Bjork had known it well enough to tell… she still wins many points for the science props.


#17

I came in here to say that. Thanks for stealing my thunder, bozo


#18

I don’t like to eat potato chips, because they make me feel greasy!


#19

Isn’t that a line from somewhere else?

Also, too though mother boards and circuit boards look like little cities. I began using them as canvases.


#20

Is that a quote or reference? I sure hope so


#21

Although I love the probable soon-to-be-a-meme “You shouldn’t let poets lie to you”, and that she was motivated enough to read up on how televisions worked, in a way the poet was right. Not about the hypnosis or direct brain transfer of course, but about how television is different from movies because rather than a projected image, you are looking at lots of tiny screens. In a poetical way, this is describing phosphors.