Buttle/Tuttle mixup: Cops tell innocent woman she is dead, then throw her in jail


#1

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#2

Surely the one person for whom this is very definitely "my problem" is the booking officer.

Otherwise what are they there for?

Also, what is going on with the US justice system at the moment? Has it always been this screwed up, or is this all a new level of crappy?


#3

We didn't need the picture to know what colour her skin would be.


#4

It's always been this screwed up, but old school journalism had a gentleman's agreement not to report on it unless it impacted "decent" people.


#5

Hopefully some eager lawyer will take her case for a percentage of the award and she'll never have to work again, and at least several on that force will NOT be able to work again in the law enforcement field....which is exactly the right outcome in this particular situation.

At least, a girl can dream.


#6


#7

Sure you did. The only thing that mattered here was that she couldn't afford her own attorney - once they know that, they don't care about your "rights" anymore.


#8

This sort of thing happens in St. Louis all the time!


#9

Turns out we don't need a picture to know what colour your skin is, either.


#10

Thats a striking list, some of those people were held for a long time.

And what really makes me wonder is the handful of "unknowns" on the list for people who were arrested, how does that work?

You arrest the wrong person and you never find out who the wrong person was?


#11

The perfect Catch 22:

She's arrested and jailed, but because they realize they have the wrong person, she can't get a court appointed attorney.


#12

This isn't the first time a mixup like this has occurred to someone with that surname.


#13

Pratchett's "Mort":

'Oh dear,' he said, 'I think this is going to be serious. May I see the palm of your hand, please?'

He examined it for a long time. Alter a while he went to the dresser, took a jeweller's eyeglass out of a drawer, wiped the porridge off it with the sleeve of his robe, and spent another few minutes examining her hand in minutest detail. Eventually he sat back, removed the glass, and stared at her.

'You're dead,' he said.

Keli waited. She couldn't think of any suitable reply. 'I'm not' lacked a certain style, while 'Is it serious?' seemed somehow too frivolous.

'Did I say I thought this was going to be serious?' said Cutwell.

'I think you did,' said Keli carefully, keeping her tone totally level.

'I was right.'

'Oh.'

'It could be fatal.'

'How much more fatal,' said Keli, 'than being dead?'

'I didn't mean for you.'

'Oh.'

'Something very fundamental seems to have gone wrong, you see. You're dead in every sense but the, er, actual. I mean, the cards think you're dead. Your lifeline thinks you're dead. Everything and everyone thinks you're dead.'

'I don't,' said Keli, but her voice was less than confident.

'I'm afraid your opinion doesn't count.'


#14

I wonder how much they billed her for food and lodging, and the zip-ties she used?


#15

I assure you, Mrs. Buttle, the Ministry is very scrupulous about following up and eradicating any error. If you have any complaints which you'd like to make, I'd be more than happy to send you the appropriate forms.


#16

And it's a damned good thing she didn't put blood on any police uniforms, or they'd have her for destruction of public property!


#17

www.instantrimshot.com


#18

the banality of evil


#19

She's damn lucky that the po po didn't try to "fix" their error once they found out that Ms. "Raquel" was dead.

"If you'll please turn around and face the wall." Ch-CHK!
"what's happening?"
"You see Ms. RAQUEL McNeal, the records say you're dead. As far as we're concerned, this is an easily correctable situation..."


#20

Oh, you said I'm supposed to respect police? I thought I was supposed to infect police....

BBL, I have a few phone calls to make.