Cabybaras break out of Toronto zoo, on the lam for 3 weeks


#1

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#3

Oh, Canada, even your escaped animals are adorable. If this was Florida…


#4


#5

Wait, on the lam? I thought those things were vegetarians.


#6

I had thought the word “Brobdingnagian” was ruined by 1970s porn novels but now I’m not so certain.


#7

Well, those things do make regular guinea pigs look postively Liliputian.


#8

Just be glad it’s not Australia.


#9

Guess it says something about our city that this has remained a news story for weeks :slight_smile:

The funniest part is we’ve had more than our share of sightings and blurry phone pics of the little guys frolicking in high park, but no one can seem to apprehend them. :smiley:


#10

What happens if they start fraternizing with the locals?
http://www.discovery.com/embed?page=73716


#11

That proves they’re not related to guinea pigs – they’re actually related to Bigfoot!


#12

Can’t guess…but too afraid to Google it.


#13

Some yahoos will ruin anything.


#14

If they crossbreed with the raccoons, we might as well just abandon the city.


#15


#16

They will overwhelm us with their adorability and opposable thumbs. Just like our future marmoset overlords will.


#17

Three weeks without a trace? Somehow I think they’ve been eaten.


#18

That’s a mighty big beaver!

(a line which could be used in both a 1970’s nature show and porn)


#19

They were spotted as recently as last night. Anyway, it isn’t capybara season.

The amazing thing is that High Park is only about 400 acres (160 hectares), half the size of Central Park in New York, and only one third of it is in a natural state, yet these large animals have managed to evade an intensive search for weeks.


#20

Is it wrong that I’m actively rooting for Bonnie & Clyde?


#21

If it is, millions of Torontonians (and Twitter followers) don’t want to be right. Best case scenario is that they have a summer of joyous freedom, then get caught and returned to a nice warm shelter before winter sets in.