Car with front end body damage gets repaired


#1

Originally published at: http://boingboing.net/2016/09/29/car-with-front-end-body-damage.html


#2

I suppose it was inevitable that some craftsman would try taking this in the other direction.


#3

Finally! Artisinal autobody repair! I’m a little concerned that the plywood wasn’t hand harvested and laminated using an authentic 200 year-old restored screw press, but you have to give start ups time to perfect their supply chain and artistic workflow. I’d like to see butcher block on the next model, and a conversion to biodesil…


#4

Somehow I don’t think this is quite legal…


#5

When all you’ve got is a hammer…


#6

And a Skill saw, don’t forget the Skill saw…


#7

Sure, but does it have some fart-pipes on the back?


#8

Or an artisinal wooden spoiler:


#9

If I’m not mistaken, that’s a shot from “The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Driftwood”.


#10

Better hope his engine doesn’t overheat.

Which reminds me, years ago when I lived in Seattle there was a guy who attached a radiator from a Ford to the front of his air-cooled VW bus, with pipes going around the sides to the engine compartment (I assume he had a Ford engine in there too.) It looked like hell, but it worked, so, whatever . . . .


#11

My first car was a VW Bug, 69, with completely rusted out floor pans. It was so bad the supports were rotten too, so new floor pans couldn’t be installed. So we bolted plywood on the bottom of the car, carpeted the top and put thin sheetmetal underneath so we could pass inspection.

Drove that car for two years.


#12

Morgan has been making wooden cars for over a century. There’s nothing inherently wrong with using wood in car manufacture.

The example in this posting is definitely suspect, though. I certainly doubt it meets passenger impact regulations.


#13

To what degree are car repairs required to meet Federal car standards?


#14

wuzzat yellow thingy??? You gotta hold up a CD to measure that sort of thing.


#15

You hear about the wooden car?

It wooden go.


#16

Wood? Would not.


#17

I don’t really know the answer so this is speculation. Not repairing your car to OEM standards would likely open you up to additional liability, denial of insurance, denial of registration (if your state does regular inspecations), and harassment by law enforcement.

Beyond it being an obviously home-brew hood, there’s many things there that are definitely not up to spec like the exposed wheel wells, improper lighting, and so on.


#18

I think you mean a banana. This is BoingBoing. Bananas are the measure of all things.


#19

Not super sure I’d want to drive that anywhere above 25mph, for reasons of both safety and fuel economy. And yeah, heat dispersion juuuuust might be a problem.

But all in all…not a bad job!


#20

I suspect stunt rather than actual, permanent repair.

But, for no good reason, the picture gave me a happy smile.