City Attorneys train local cops to use "wish lists" for civil forfeiture


#1

Originally published at: http://boingboing.net/2014/11/10/city-attorneys-train-local-cop.html


#2

They’re making a list;
They’re checking it twice;
Deciding in advance whose naughty or nice;

Seize-a-Claus Santa Seize is coming to town!


#3

I’m pretty sure that the cops have their own wish lists…


Edit: Via


#4

#5

My inner optimist would like to hope that at least somebody involved in this occasionally scratches his head and wonders “Why does this training sound so much like that fence operation be busted a while back?”; but I’d be inclined to doubt it.

It sounds like the attorney’s advice on the relative value of different sorts of stolen property, and the difficulty of disposing of it, is good; but that’s not really a virtue.

(also, the ‘“I can’t tell you how many people have come in and said, ‘Oh, my hijito would never do that,’ ” he said, mimicking a female voice with a Spanish accent.’ part of the training is some tactical nuclear keeping it classy. Definitely makes me less nervous about a possible…disproportionate application…of these laws.)


#6

Turning into Sin City. Trust the criminals more than the cops.


#7

They could put a better font collection on that list. Man!


#8

Sounds just like the medieval Catholic Church.

Might be time for a Reformation.


#9

this has been big business for police forces at all levels since 1984 because drugs. there were some very harsh stories about it in the late 80s but it’s too lucrative for law enforcement agencies and even when the normally police-worshipful republican party tries to do something to stop it, well . . . from the linked article-- " In the Georgia session, the prosecutor leading the talk boasted that he had helped roll back a Republican-led effort to reform civil forfeiture in Georgia, where seized money has been used by the authorities, according to news reports, to pay for sports tickets, office parties, a home security system and a $90,000 sports car."

i’ve never been an optimist about this.


#10

Holly fucking shit Batman! It sounds just like organized crime!


#11

Was wondering about the applicability of RICO laws in such cases, myself.


#12

It was from the Reddit Crappy Design thread…


#13

The Spanish Inquisition was modern.


#14

Then again, it is rather gratifying seeing some asshole lose his Porsche.


#15

The secret videos came from somebody so your inner optimist gets their hope realized. However, your inner pessimist can still say “yeah, one”.


#16

I was actually thinking of the Abbot of St. Alban’s sending armed men out and confiscating the hand-mills of the peasants, thereby forcing them to buy the services of the Abbey mill in order to make their bread. The Abbot paved his parlor with the stolen millstones, where he held audience with commoners.

We are forced to pay taxes to support the police who then rob us, and nobody even tries to pretend that this is not so. It’s accepted, just like the Abbot’s parlor floor.


#17

There’s a brief discussion here

Crisis of Truth: Literature and Law in Ricardian England
can you suggest a better source?


#18

Pacify. Adjust. Manipulate.

Pam is a bitch. Where is that piece of paper where my rights as a human being in this country were written on go?

I wonder if these people know they can say NO cuff me, take me in and detain me for said crime. I dare you. Have some balls man.

Try to go to trial with that bullcrap. I dare you.

I will sue the shit out of you; mobster, police officer, or thug.


#19

Wow that is so messed up on so many levels. I know never to travel with large amounts of cash. There are places where the cops make a mint pulling over out of towners, finding cash, and claiming it is drug money and seizing it.


#20

Yep, thuggery at its most efficient.