Delightful notes and signs from Portland, Oregon


#1

Originally published at: http://boingboing.net/2016/03/02/delightful-notes-and-signs-fro.html


#2

I hate these blogs that think they’re being so clever by infinitely scrolling and repeating content. Just post each pic once, AMIRITE? It’s OK to get to the bottom and for that to be the end.


#3

One of the double-edged swords of smartphones is the ease with which we can collect and share these ephemeral treasures. Portland may have the advantage of a slightly weirder populace than most places but you can find these gems in almost any major city. As proof I submit this that I captured just yesterday:


#4

Leaving a note to say “Don’t park in this legal parking spot because it bothers me; sincerely, Anonymous” is totally baffling. I’ve received one of those myself and it just makes you want to garrote somebody.


#5

OTOH, we’d all be much better off if people took some personal responsibility to not be a dick, instead of saying “it’s legal, so I can do it.” and leaving us with loads of crap laws with no wiggle room.


#6

I’m trying to understand whether that last one was taking by the letter writer or the thief.


#7

I used to get notes on my legally parked motor scooter requesting that I park on the sidewalk. Because sure, why shouldn’t I risk getting a ticket for illegally blocking a pedestrian walkway with my motor vehicle so someone else can have a few extra feet of curb space to park their car.


#8

I’m trying to understand how parking in a legal spot on a city street and then walking someone is “being a dick.”


#9

“People who live next to public land should have exclusive use of it” is Cliven Bundy logic…


#10

It’s not necessarily, it’s all about context. But just because it’s legal, it doesn’t make it reasonable. To be clear, the complaint in the note is reasonable - if you continue to park here like you have, we’ll end up with permits, and that’s just crap for everyone.

I actually think signs are a great way to convey the point. It presents an alternative perspective and costs both parties almost nothing - a means of communicating to establish an understanding. Though I’d advocate sign writers taking ownership of their handiwork - anonymous signs are obnoxious because they don’t allow a bidirectional dialogue.


#11

PS if you don’t mind commiting another misdemeanor tonight…

I’ll admit, I lost it on that one. As someone who has also been in the situation of having a shitty car that people kept trying to steal (and always by breaking the window, when a butter knife could have opened the door lock), I applaud this person’s outlook on life.


#12

Please stop leaving nonsensical comments on this public board without any sensible reasoning to back them up, that leads to unhinged polka dancing and then we all lose out.


#13

I love the handwriting in that first picture (“You have no business parking here…”). It’s gorgeous.


#14

This makes Portland seem like a shitty place to live


#15

I approve of this message:


#16

“I saw you park and then walk away” seems fairly context free.


#17

On the fifteenth hand, we have signs all over our library: requests to go outside if you want to have a huge cellphone conversation, no eating or drinking please, directional signs, informational signs. The problem is that people start getting desensitized to the signs and ignore them or don’t see them in the general confusion. Then someone knocks over their water bottle onto the power bar and blows out a whole chain of our computers.


#18

How would the note’s recipient even have known they were “being a dick”?

I know, maybe the author could put up a sign informing everyone that this is their spot, and not to park in it. That doesn’t seem dickish at all.

It wouldn’t be crap for the note’s author; they’d have a legal right to park near their home. They’re rightly upset they don’t have that now. But they shouldn’t take out that frustration on anyone who happens to park in a spot no one has any special right to.


#19

Is it more reasonable to move to an area that has little parking because it is within a walking distance to fun things and then complain when people park there and walk to the fun? Isn’t that blaming somebody else for the consequences of your own choices. It doesn’t seem unreasonable to me to force those who wish to have preferential access to a public street because they live there to go through the process of getting zoned parking approved and getting permits.


#20

Who knows. I have little to say about the merits of the particular sign, just that it’s a really useful tool. Clearly the person had a grievance and aired it. The recipient of the sign may or may not empathize and will act accordingly. I know nothing about the background to this, and neither do you (unless you do, in which case, I’m curious to know more).