Documentary about Quidditch


#1

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#2

That’s a pretty offensive name for a movie!


#3

As it happens, the guy who plays Seeker is also a rodeo champion.


#4

It’s a shame she designed that game so badly - it makes absolutely no sense as a sport. Five players play their hearts out for an hour, and then somebody else’s only job is to make their effort moot. Imagine if NFL football worked this way - if a field goal was worth 100 points and ended the game.


#5

Sort of reflects the class structure from whence it came. You know…you’re born a witch or wizard, which, while not hereditary, still leaves with the fact that some people are just innately better than others; even if you’re not a muggle, sometimes you’re just cannon fodder for a Chosen One; you can be a Chaser, a Beater, or a Keeper, but never quite as important as the Seeker…


#6

I never looked at it that way. Being American, our class structure is concealed under layers of coy obfuscation, not blatantly displayed like it is in the UK.


#7

There is a certain amount of strategy involved. If the opposing team is up by more than 150 points and your team’s seeker finds the snitch your team still loses.

I agree, though, that it’s still pretty bad design since scoring a goal is only ten points, and it’s difficult enough to do that the team whose seeker finds the snitch is almost always guaranteed a win. And with the snitch being extremely small and hard to see I don’t know how they could avoid a seeker being able to occasionally palm it and only pretend to find it when the score was in his or her team’s favor.


#8

Moreover, if I was the coach, my team would simply abandon the goal and brutalize the opposing seeker. I am a bad man.


#9

Draco Malfoy: the only one in the wizarding world who was willing to tell it like it is.


#10

I’ve never managed to reverse-engineer how ANY sport more complicated than ‘who went the fastest’ works, so kudos for being able to pick it apart…


#11

Seems like a perfect use for those one-wheeled, self-balancing motorized unicycles. Much closer to flying than just running around with a broom between your legs.


#12

YES. someone, please, make this happen. once they lose the brooms and use those segway-like unicycles, this would be pretty amazing to watch.


#13

Actually, the game’s point system has been redesigned for the competitive version played at universities: catching the snitch is only worth 30 points (the equivalent of 3 goals). Good chasers, keepers and beaters are as a result definitely way more valuable to a team than good seekers for competitive quidditch.

Source: I play quidditch for Stanford


#14

They use magic. (Duh.)


#15

Good idea - my point exactly.


#16

Yep. The inherent conceit of the narrative favors the non-muggles. Of course, one shouldn’t be cruel about it, be we all know, don’t we.


#17

And both the work and its author are products of the UK. Quod erat demonstrandum! POFF!


#18

“Protagonist who gets amazing powers through no effort on their own part” is actually a pretty common plot device in escapist fiction. Luke Skywalker, Peter Parker, the New Olympians series, etc. feature main characters who either inherited their powers from parents they never knew or acquired them by pure chance.


#19

I think this topic has covered just about everything I hate in Harry Potter in one page.


#20

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