Easily find top rated movies on Netflix


#1

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#2

I’d like to see a scholarly article – or just a blog post, or a snarky reply, really – on the differences between the rankings displayed on RottenTomatoes and IMDB. And other ranking sites as well.

RottenTomatoes is weighted much more by critics, and IMDB I assume is random users, right? RT’s list looks much more “critically acclaimed,” while IMDB’s looks “popular.”


#3

Other than a friend’s husband who seems to like watching the same entertainment I do, Netflix is my next best pal at anticipating what I will and won’t like in films. Really, it’s uncanny. Rotten Tomatoes? - not so much. I’m also a full star less pleased in the rating of films than those ‘in my area’. But I’m not having any trouble finding films to watch, there are 112 films in my queue, all never seen before, rated three stars or more, and I’m an avid fan of the medium. I’ve heard people complain that they can’t find anything on Netflix to watch. Needless to say, I’m completely puzzled by this. The Netflix library is ginormous.


#4

It’s left as an exercise for the reader as to which of those two types of ratings would be more accurate for the average viewer. :slight_smile:


#5

Anyone know if there is some insight into the region you’re in?

Just because “Netflix” has it, doesn’t mean Netflix in [my country] has it.


#6

IMDB top 250 is indeed “popular”. It is heavily weighted to the movies of the last 10 years and appears to sway towards the current notion that the last thing you enjoyed was “the best thing ever”. I stopped paying attention to it after repeatedly seeing outstanding classic films get bumped off in favor of the new hotness.

In what universe is The Dark Knight the 4th best movie of all time?

It would be interesting to have a movie rating site where users would have to rate movies on a bell curve with only one movie rated a 10. If you wanted to rate your new favorite thing a ‘10’, you’d have to downgrade the last one to one of the limited number of ‘9.5’ spots.


#7

I use instantwatcher.com, which offers a lot more granularity (though not IMDB ratings). Mostly I check to see what’s been added every day, but you can search by genre, NYT critics’ picks, worst-rated, etc.

Aaaaand that’s how I just learned they added Snowpiercer today. Woot.


#8

A very interesting idea. It wouldn’t be too hard to code.

Although I’m not certain about a bell curve. Sure, you might have only one 10.0, but only one 1.0? There is a very big floor effect with movies, as with other artwork. I’d say a half-bell (is there a term for that?). Stuff as many movies as you want at the bottom of the pile, but you have to be more and more judicious as you rank higher.

But of course it’s very difficult to rank movies on a single dimension – you might have your 10.0 classic drama and your 10.0 screwball comedy. So I guess you’ll need to have several ranked lists, for different genres or situations…


#9

I just created a username (lost my old one?), to post about instant watcher. Glad someone beat me to it. It’s the best. Although I do like the simple design of whatisonnetflix.


#10

Unfortunately it’s this universe. I think we’re in the wrong one.


#11

If they were guides to restaurants rather than movies, RottenTomatoes would highlight Michelin Star establishments, and IMDB would recommend McDonald’s.


#12

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