Europe just voted to wreck the internet, spying on everything and censoring vast swathes of our communications


#63

Brilliant!


#64

" there are tens of millions of voters who will vote against a candidate who “broke the internet.” Not breaking the internet is very important to voters"

Depends on how quickly, and how much, the internet is perceived as having been broken.

There was a lot of wailing and gnashing of teeth when the Obama net neutrality rules were neutered (sorry) - but if I hadn’t read about it, I would absolutely never known it had happened.


#65

And a pretty good one. The problem is the power differential between lobbyists that lobby for things that are supported by lots of people of normal wealth, and lobbyists who lobby for things only supported by a few entities of incredible wealth.


#66

Well it’s been fun gang. I’ll see you all on the next distributed network.


#67

RetroShare is also quite nice. Though it sometimes randomly refuses to work and then I have no clue how to fix it. Also I have no idea how actively it is developed currently. I have used it to share my photo/homemovie collections with my parents for a few years but have switched over to Syncthing some time ago for that purpose, because it is somewhat more reliable and user friendly.


#68

Save your Internet has a neat map showing how each country voted and if you click on one, the MEPs responsible.


#69

I doubt YouTube would fight you if you claimed you did own the copyright and started submitting violation reports of Sony music and other videos.


#70

The laughable copy protection measures that became laughable DRM measures are now no less laughable than they were before. If i want to send my content out to the cool kids now, without havi g to get permission from Big Content, there are a host of programming tricks and internet hacks at my disposal to tunnel through this firewall. The only question to be answered, is if content consumers will jump through these hoops to get access to unfiltered content.

I’m thinking some media-savvy varient on Mastadon should be just the thing at this point.


#71

“The first thing we do, let’s kill all the lawyers” — William Shakespeare’s Henry VI, Part 2, Act IV, Scene 2


#72

Lowest common denominator. Speaking as someone responsible for a LOT of internet infrastructure: You build for the most restrictive regulations so something doesn’t fall through. Easier to subject everyone to upload filtering than deal with what happens if you miss someone who should have been filtered.

I’m virtually certain that this decision will result in most EU web publications never being linked to outside the EU by anyone smaller than an org like the NYT, though.


#73

Filtering. It will happen both ways. Companies that don’t want to deal with the GDPR today filter EU traffic. The natural effect of not being able to go after small actors (hey, like us!) will be to filter their content so it can’t work from within the EU.


#74

We are absolutely not going down this false equivalency path here. Someone advocating for an end to genocide != someone advocating that their company win an exclusive govt contract. It is an infantile position to try and pretend that all causes carry equal weight intrinsically. Do so elsewhere.


#75

I wonder if this is going to make the Internet much worse than it already is, though.

For me, the Internet is already broken. What broke it? The lack of regulation that gave us the total dominance of the Internet giants, Amazon and Google and Facebook and Twitter. An Internet that consists of mainly those four companies, and a lot of spinoffs that are completely dependent on Google’s search algorithms, is completely broken.

The main culprits, the worst sinners, in this context, are Google and Amazon. Google, who started out with a grant from the US intelligence services (at Stanford Research Institute, for crying out loud!) and has since made a business model out of knowing everything about everyone, a company whose massive surveillance trumps even the NSA’s quite monumental efforts - and Amazon, whose business model is to squeeze their human employees to the very last drop of blood before they discard them.

Facebook are only the third most evil of these giants. And these are the companies who have effectively committed a denial of service attack on the internet at large!

For the Internet to get unbroken, we need to move completely away from this universe of “large players”, back to the old decentralization. Away from huge services where one global player owns everything, Uber or Lyft the rides, Soundcloud or Spotify the music, Google all of search, videos and email, Amazon all retail.

Honestly, we need good old-fashioned anti-trust regulation to smash those monopolies. I don’t know that this EU law, stupid as it may be, is going to make any difference in the real struggle to free our Internet these days: Smashing Google, the arch-enemy of Internet privacy, and the other monopolies.


#76

Well sheeet. This is almost enough to turn one into a Euroskeptic. Except…UKIP. Can I be a semi-skeptic?


#77

Yup, distributed app’s time has come.


#78

Sure, but that’s a risk I’m willing to take, and probably a few others too.


#79

Yes, I had something like this in mind. Existing tools may be slow and clunky, but if the EU is going to take away the internet, that might speed up adoption and development a bit.

Like with all willfully ignorant and malicious moves of the ruling classes, I hope that they bring us step by step to a point where people are bothered enough to to something about them.


#80

They’ve legitimized what they were already doing and would have continued to do either way.

On the positive side we now know what they are officially doing. Its a bit like ending prohibition for government cyber spying! They were going to do it anyway but now we potentially have some oversight in what they are doing.

If you thought governments and powerful corporations weren’t going to spy on us you were deluded. This is the other side of the great internet that we pretended we could control. This brave new world comes with pro’s and con’s.


#81

“It’s like the right-wing politicians who spent 40 years describing roads, firefighting, health care, education and Social Security as “socialism,” and thereby created a generation of people who don’t understand why they wouldn’t be socialists, then.”

I’m over 60, and I have NEVER heard “right-wing” politicians describe roads, firefighting, and education as “socialism”. The others, yeah, occasionally. You say THEY created the desire for socialism? Uh, no.

It isn’t left-wingers who didn’t want to join the EU. It isn’t left-wingers who want Brexit.


#82

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