FBI replies to Stingray Freedom of Information request with 5,000 blank pages

#1

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#2

If they worked with the DEA just imagine what they could accomplish!

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#3

FBI: you know those information laws we have to protect our freedom - we mock them.

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#4

[Comment redacted.]

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#5

“F— Y—.”

There. Same message and you save the office about 10 reams of paper.

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#6

They probably are. I don’t think I’ve heard anything but rumors…

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#7

I guess there must be some reason I don’t give a meh when I read about violence against police and law enforcement.

Maybe someday I’ll go to therapy to work out why.

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#8

Our country would be a better place if we paid a lot of our federal employees to stay home and watch TV. Starting with this crowd.

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#9

They probably rationalize this kind of response with the fact that they’re bound by extremely restrictive use contracts. I’ve read that police forces across the nation fall back on a “we can’t reveal anything we’re bound by contract to keep secret” argument when questioned about Stingray technology, and the ways in which they use it.

I’ve got a simple solution to that “problem”: the contracts should be voided. They were written with the intent of stymieing exactly this kind of inquiry, and are fundamentally illegitimate.

Writing a contract in order to evade or negate the law is in itself illegal. Doing so usually makes the contract (or at least the part of it designed to end-run the law) go bye-bye. The problem is: those who are using these illegal contract clauses to hide illegal patterns of activity are way too powerful to let this happen.

We’ve been on a slippery flume chute away from democracy since 9-11, and we really need to end the ride.

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#10

Many of those files are labeled “b5”

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#11

Since the only visible content is the exemption codes–

here’s a guide to what they all mean

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#12

Perhaps we should focus on the carriers and encourage them harden their cell sites and (where applicable) the hansets.

In addition, the hardened firmware should also enable any properly owned cell site to tell all joined hansets to search & destroy any noted and unauthenticated sites with a coordinated DDoS and paging service alerts. Since the carrier owns the frequencies in question and the operator of the stingray doesn’t, this should be a nice open and shut case for the FCC.

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#13

At first glance, I thought all the entries of “B5” were actually “BS” (I know they are BS, I just thought they said BS)

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#14

Fucking
Bureaucratic
Imperialists

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#15

At least they’re redacting information with white boxes instead of black ones now. Someone in the department must have finally realized how much toner they were wasting.

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#16

I miss the days when cmd-c, cmd-v was all that was required.

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closed #17

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