Fights on planes 400% more likely when there's a first class section


#1

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New study: Air rage triggered by walking through First Class
#2

I think this should be known as Snowpiercer Syndrome.


#3

Oh man, now I kind of want/dread a Snowpiercer sequel set on an improbably large airplane.


#4

I’ve only flown first class once. I can’t remember how that happened. I was upgraded for some reason. It was nice. The babies served with the meals were delicious, but the fresh virgin blood to wash it down was something I will never forget.


#5

I assume they properly controlled for variables such as type of flight etc. Are there comparable flights with both first class and without first class. For example are there long haul flights to Australia without a first class section? Do any mid size planes board from the middle - especially if they have no middle door (yes they could board from the rear - if the airport infrastructure permits).


#6

Planes having "fist class cabins" sound like they are purpose built for altercations.


#7

Snakes on a Cloudpiercer!

Who put these snakes on my motherfucking cloudpiercer? I did, they decrease the surplus population and taste like chicken! Actually, so does the surplus population. Win/Win!


#8

I’m not interested in the food. How was the in-flight fight? Was it as great as Frauenfelder’s testimonial promises?


#9

I guess you could say this is a case of…

dons sunglasses

Class warfare.

YEEEEEEAAAAAAAAH!!!


#10

While on the one hand, this seems intuitively obvious, I can think of another explanation…

Maybe nasty people fly first class, and their nastiness is contagious in close quarters.


#11

It’s really unpleasant when the plebs try to use our bathrooms. Didn’t they listen to the safety briefing about staying in their own section?


#12

No fight. Everyone knew their place this time.


#13

I was holding out for “Have you ever tried to punch someone in economy? Not nearly enough space to swing your fist.”


#14

For the lol’s next time you’re boarding, when you inch your way through first class, gaze distractedly at your smartphone while muttering under your breath: “Fuck fuck fuck! The goddamned market has to crash on the first day of my vacation! Fuck!..”

You’ll see some worried First Class Citizens and Big Swinging Dicks slowly glance at their phones in unison.


#15

I cannot imagine anything at all changing because of this study.


#16

There are flights without a first class section? Even when I was on little regional hops there was a first class section.
tangent story:
I was on a hop on a little plane from Dallas to Phoenix and used points to get a first class seat. I had been in the lounge before, ordered a rum & coke (I rarely drink, don’t know what the cool drinks are) and told the barkeep I was going to see my mother in law, so he poured me a glass of rum with a squirt of coke on top. Got on the plane, sat down, they handed me a glass of wine, and then started taking off so I had to slug it. As soon as they were in the air they gave me another, which I finished reasonably quickly so they gave me a refill.

On landing Phoenix airport seemed way less annoying than usual, and my mother in law was a lot more fun to be around.


#17

Was she a little hotter than you remember her being?


#18

You know 1 fight in non segregated planes and five in segregated planes is 400% more. Relative statistics don’t mean crap with out the absolute numbers.
*Edited to fix my mistake see comment below.


#19

That’s 300% more. Having 50% more is 150% of the original number; having 400% more is 500% of the original number, so the number being compared multiplied by five.


#20

This study is garbage. Here’s a statistician’s takedown of all the weird assumptions underlying it: http://andrewgelman.com/2016/05/03/ahhhh-ppnas/. In addition to noting the falsely precise coefficients, these are the most important criticisms:

– The interpretation of zillions of regression coefficients, each one controlling for all the others. For example, “As predicted, front boarding of planes predicted 2.18-times greater odds of an economy cabin incident than middle boarding (P = 0.005; model 2), an effect equivalent to an additional 5-h and 58-min flight delay (0.7772 front boarding/0.1305 delay hours).” What does it all mean? Who cares!

– No raw data. Sorry, proprietary restrictions so nobody can reproduce this analysis! (Don’t get me wrong, I have no problem with researchers learning from proprietary information, I do it all the time. What the National Academy of Sciences is doing publishing this sort of thing, I have no idea. Or, yes, I do have an idea, but I don’t like it.)

– Story time: “We argue that exposure to both physical and situational inequality can result in antisocial behavior. . . . even temporary exposure to physical inequality—being literally placed in one’s “class” (economy class) for the duration of a flight—relates to antisocial behavior . . .”

– A charming reference in the abstract to testing of predictions, even though no predictions were supplied before the data were analyzed.