First order of business for hard-right government, canceling Croatia's answer to The Daily Show


#1

[Read the post]


#2

So is this a preview of what happens if Trump becomes President?


#3

You said exactly what I was thinking.

@doctorow, is there any plan to internet some satire up in there?

To the research machine!


#4

Different and probably unConstitutional methods, but the same goals:

Donald Drumpf threatened on Friday to change America’s libel laws to make it easier to sue media companies.

Drumpf told the press that if he becomes president, then he would rewrite US libel laws so people can “sue you like you’d never get sued before.”

Source


#5

I’m sure John Oliver is working on it.


#6

This shows why it’s a bad idea to have state media in the first place.


#7

Huh. My own take away is that this is why it’s bad to elect hard-right government. Silly me.


#8

privately owned media can have its problems too.


#9

I think we can agree that the media should be free of government censorship. State ownership makes it so much more likely and easier for it to happen.


#10

Proof again that conservatives are a buzz kill.


#11

State owned media also produce programs that private/investor owned media can’t or won’t because the ROI is all wrong for profit seekers.


#12

Sometimes killing a popular show is the blunder that brings down a government.


#14

I’m sure you realize Croatia is not in the Czech Repubilc.


#15

I’ll see myself out.


#16

I’d like to leave this here:


I love this documentary. It’s pretty amazing. Yes the US State Department was involvedl Otpor also relied heavily on the works of Gene Sharp.

Perhaps we should all be studying it for the instructive lessons it presents…

Interview with one of the principals here:


in part:

… on October 5, 2000, hundreds of thousands of Serbian protesters descended on the streets of Belgrade and pushed past the indifferent security forces to seize control of the Parliament building, effectively ending the dictatorship of Slobodan Milosovic. It was the final act of a two-year nonviolent struggle led by the youth movement known as Otpor, or “Resistance,” whose iconic clenched-fist led the way toward free elections and newfound democracy.

One of the leaders of this movement was 27-year-old Srdja Popovic, who after Milosevic’s overthrow was elected to the Serbian Parliament. …

Oh Mr. Popovic, I am sorry to hear things have taken a turn for the worse! I am having a hard time figuring out what to believe about you:

(I’m off to go find a moral compass, a ball of string, a candle, and a map for this terra incognita)


#17

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