Florida sheriff apprehends multi-state LEGO thief


#1

[Read the post]


#2

Leggo my Legos?


#3

Throw the brick at him.


#4

Just make him step on it. Barefoot.


#5

Like the caltrops used in this earlier post, maybe the store can throw random Lego on the floor to deter shoplifting…


#6

Ultimate torture:


#7

How many dollars’ worth of Lego can you cram into one treasure chest? Like all shoplifters, the dude sucks at cost-benefit analysis.


#8

CSB Time:

I remember when I was once a kid and my mom did something that pissed me off sufficiently that I decided to be a total brat about it. I told her I wasn’t talking to her, and in an moment of pure defiance, I set up a line of Legos at the entrance to my room. I recall sulking for about an hour before realizing no one gave a shit and then building something with the Legos.


#9

According to the linked article, the answer is $300. So, not exactly the Treasure of Lima, but still a pretty good haul


#10

Aw.

That’s adorable.


#11

That can actually just be one or two sets, actually.


#12

That’s shop lifting 101. It is why you check any item like that. And under the cart. And watch out of people putting crap under their baby in a stroller.

Of course at 16 and at Walmart I cared about thieves. Maybe today’s checkers don’t or are too busy to catch them all. I know the big sets usually have those anti-theft chips.


#13

Most loss-prevention is geared towards theft by employees these days.


#14

Legos are worth more than most other toys by weight or volume, because of the precision manufacturing process they require, and because they give a lot more value for money. Legos might actually be the most shopliftable items at Toys’R’Us, barring CCGs or video games, which are usually locked behind glass. (Or in low-capacity shelf dispensers, for CCGs.)

It’s also quite possible that the guy wasn’t reselling them, he just really likes Legos. I think we can all sympathize with that.


#15

Maybe he was hoarding them until 3D printing puts the Lego company out of business and they become collectibles.

#LegosWantToBeFree


#16

Amazing. Now, you could look at that article and conclude something is seriously wrong with our economy. Or you could read it, and decide peoples’ morals just ain’t what they used to be.


#17


#18

You can more easily read it as a testimonial to the excellence of the whatever county FLORIDA sheriff, stopping this nationally wanted criminal.


#19

The article didn’t have his photo…


#20

That will probably take a good bit longer than people realize. The manufacturing tolerances to make a Lego brick that will lock into place solidly, but still separate easily, are ridiculous–somewhere around 2 microns. That’s why Mega Bloks and so forth are never as good; they can’t match Lego’s quality.