GOP-led hearing on gun silencer deregulation canceled after today's shooting


#139

Most acquired hearing loss involves a reduction in the ability to discriminate sounds rather than an inability to perceive them.

E.g I can tell that people are talking, I just can’t make out what they’re saying.


#140

Fair enough.


#141

Why can’t this be solved by legislating reasonable restrictions and by requiring licensing and registration through the ATF? This is how we deal with people who feel the urge to own a retired Sherman or a Gatling gun.

But I’m very not interested in the Tyranny of the Minority. That’s how you end up with attacks on female bodily autonomy. [Hey, I guess it kinda does tie in!] You’re also ignoring cities below the Mason-Dixon line. Is it more legal to discharge a firearm within Atlanta city limits than it is within Boston city limits?


#142

Never met someone with partial hearing loss? It usually is for certain frequencies. He has trouble hearing lower ranges, and often time he hears sound, but its muffled and not clear, as with voices.

At any rate, he isn’t deaf and when I visit I have heard it some times.

Yes, that’s what he has.


#143

Yes, that’s already been explained to me by someone else.

I’m sure I’ve met someone with partial hearing loss, but not known it.

But I’ve not known someone intimately enough to discuss the finer points.


#144

As a semi-relevant tangent, a bit of the neuroscience of hearing…

Your inner ear looks like this:

The three canals are your vestibular system; fluid moving through those, deflecting tiny hairs in the process, allows you to detect head movement and provides a large part of your sense of balance.

The snail-shell bit at the bottom is the sound detector. It’s also full of fluid and tiny hairs, which are connected to nerves that respond to movement of the hairs.

Any sound that hits the tympanic membranes (the “eardrum”) creates a wave in that fluid, which moves down the cochlea deflecting hairs as it goes. High frequency sound creates short rapid waves, low frequency sound creates long slow waves.

The system measures sound in two ways, described as “time” and “place”. Neither system is perfect; they each have a margin of error, so they only tell your brain that the sound is somewhere between frequencies x and y. However, by using two independent methods, you get much greater precision, as you can narrow the range of possibilities to just that area where the two ranges intersect.

|---------|          System 1
       |---------|   System 2
       |--|          Combined precision

The “time” system works by using the entire membrane. It measures the time delay between pulses, and computes the frequency of the signal from that.

The “place” system makes use of the fact that the hair cells on the cochlear membrane are laid out in a “tonotopic” pattern. All that means is that the hairs at the start of the membrane are a bit stiffer, and the flexibility increases as you move further along. The stiffness of the hair affects the frequency at which it resonates most strongly, which allows the brain to determine frequency by looking at which spot on the membrane is generating the strongest response.

Acquired hearing loss is normally caused by excess sound pressure destroying some of the detector hair cells. It just physically breaks them. The stiffer, tuned-for-high-frequency hairs at the start of the membrane are more brittle and closer to the outside, so they’re the first to go.

This damage leaves the “time” system largely unaffected, but trashes the “place” system, particularly in the higher frequencies. The result is a person who can still detect sound, but has trouble discriminating between similar frequencies, particularly in the higher register.


Trump's spy agencies say AI vendors will sell them needle-detection tools for infinite haystacks
#145

we are all frustrated.

safe target shooting at a sanctioned range is one of my hobbies.
I ALSO donate to Planned Parenthood.
and I ride off-road motorcycles
and i have a rescued dog.

I never considered them connected. but you are correct.

the US vs THEM - and one has to WIN!
…is what is stopping any and all progress.

I’d like to see the politicians moderating, working with each other, compromising even, and doing something FOR the people, country, and world, – instead of this US-THEM pissing match (and lining their own pockets) that everyone seems to have bought into.


#146

I think it can, but my point is that reasonable is different in different places, and the US federal government controls too many fundamentally different places for reasonable gun legislation to be reasonable at the Federal level.

I was attempting to avoid miscategorizing cities in Texas and Louisiana, actually. I’m told Atlanta is a lot more like Boston or NYC than it is like Houston or New Orleans.


#147

What do you think of the money that that gun lobbies recieve from gun makers and use to influence politicians?


#148

QFT, IMHO.


#149

I think it is eclipsed by private donations with its more than 5 Million members. The NRA is very much grass roots in that respect. Also, it isn’t that much money going directly to politicians. According to open secrets, the NRA spends ~$1 Million a year on individuals and Super Pacs at the national level. That isn’t really a lot of money. Most individuals get <$10,000 a year. I don’t think that is enough to buy a vote - and if it is - then that’s easily countered. A Million bucks is nothing.

Where their political power lies in stirring up their member base to go out and VOTE. THAT is the real power.

Much more of the money goes towards the legal arm which is the other big part of where it gets its power, challenging various laws, as well as their instructor education and safety network, competition programs, and other programs.

I am not saying the NRA is perfect, but the reality of what they do is more complicated than what most people have in their heads. Just like the ACLU isn’t full of Nazi sympathizers because they support free speech.

https://www.opensecrets.org/orgs/summary.php?id=D000000082&cycle=2014


#150

i think of it the same as the money monsanto, planned parenthood, mattel, chevron, etc - give to politicians.

it is all bad.
and it wont change. ever.

I get it - you are passionate.
how to WE work together to change the political system?

all the energy spent on ALL sides arguing? ain’t makin a lick of difference.


#151

Planned parenthood is not a corporation lobbying for laws that allow them to sell more things, and sending pre-written bills to to politicians. Please do not equate them.


#152

Hence there is no need for silenced firearms in such areas. Gunfire heard is generally far enough away from concentrations of people that it can be chalked up to legitimate use.


#153

From your link:

The total of contributions to candidates from National Rifle Assn PACs is 51 times larger than contributions from individuals

Contributions from Individuals
$16,015
Contributions from PACs
$823,200
LOBBYING: $3,188,000

"Since 2005, the gun industry and its corporate allies have given between $20 million and $52.6 million to it through the NRA Ring of Freedom sponsor program. Donors include firearm companies like Midway USA, Springfield Armory Inc, Pierce Bullet Seal Target Systems, and Beretta USA Corporation. Other supporters from the gun industry include Cabala’s, Sturm Rugar & Co, and Smith & Wesson.

The NRA also made $20.9 million - about 10 percent of its revenue - from selling advertising to industry companies marketing products in its many publications in 2010, according to the IRS Form 990.

Additionally, some companies donate portions of sales directly to the NRA. Crimson Trace, which makes laser sights, donates 10 percent of each sale to the NRA. Taurus buys an NRA membership for everyone who buys one of their guns. Sturm Rugar gives $1 to the NRA for each gun sold, which amounts to millions. The NRA’s revenues are intrinsically linked to the success of the gun business.

The NRA Foundation also collects hundreds of thousands of dollars from the industry, which it then gives to local-level organizations for training and equipment purchases."

ETA:

My votes, which are cast in every primary and election, and POWERLESS in the face of that kind of influence.


#154

Yeah, we got no (known) response to our report of actual gunfire, back in February. (If there was a police report, it isn’t online with the other reports from that time period.) 7 rapid shots, then a pause, then 2 shots, all in the space of maybe 4 seconds – someone more knowledgeable than I about firearms might be able to deduce what type of gun I heard.

Some years ago, same neighborhood, a neighbor threw a party that went into the wee hours of the morning. One of our neighbors called the cops when they saw a departing woman squat down in someone else’s yard to relieve herself. The police suggested that it was probably just someone leaving for work. The police probably had bigger problems to worry about on a weekend night/early morning, but still…


#155

They spent $3 million in 2000 on individual candidates, and then when soft money was blocked in 2002 they dropped it entirely in favor of outside spending - which is exactly what the graph shows. That $27 million in outside spending is all part of that controversial Citizen’s United ruling stuff, and on top of that there is extremely little data on small elections from the NRA.

What we do know is that about half of what the NRA does is unimpeachable good work providing training and gun safety to people, and allowing those who cannot afford it an avenue to use a gun properly. We know that the legal defense fund is only used at 5% of its revenue rate with the rest of the money not really accounted for, and we know that the industry is purposely masking its donations to the NRA by laundering money through advertisements, “voluntary” individual donations, etc.

We also know the NRA is one of the best funded and most active political influences in the “swamp” for decades, and that if they kept the legal fund and gun safety and knowledge work while dropping their PACs they would be able to be a 100% grassroots organization promoting guns in a pretty healthy way - also known as the programs no one is complaining about.

$1 million dollars is nothing, sheesh…


#156

I can’t go dig into the numbers now on where everything comes from. but that is CAMPAIGN contributions. The bulk of the over all operation costs are from donors and fun raising.

Their overall budget is over $200 million a year and ~5% comes from corporate donations.

To you and I, its a lot. In the grand scheme of things in both politics and business, it’s nothing. Like I said, most of the direct contributions are <$10,000. Yes there are other political things they do that aren’t direct contributions.

I am not saying the NRA isn’t powerful, but if it was as easy as just buying off politicians, we all would have cyborg arm cannons implanted at 18 as a requirement. Money is only part of it, the voter base is huge as well.


#157

This incident got me thinking.

One of the major arguments for the 2. amendment by gun nuts and gun hoarders is the ability to stop a tyrannical government.

The shooter, in his mind, did/tried exactly that.

Problem is: Who decides that the government is tyrannical.


#158

It’s all influencial money! Gunmakers are donating to the NRA for each gun sold, and buying NRA memberships for people who purchase guns, as well as laundering money through the organization. The operation costs are irrelevant to the political strong arming.

Every year new laws are drafted that allow more access to guns. There is a direct line to be drawn from this new legislation and the formation of “The American Silencers Association”.

"It should surprise no one that the NRA has recently thrown its weight behind an industry campaign to deregulate and promote the use of silencers. Under the trade banner of the American Silencer Association, manufacturers have come together with the support of the NRA to rebrand the silencer as a safety device belonging in every all-American gun closet. To nurture this potentially large and untapped market, the ASA last April sponsored the first annual all-silencer gun shoot and trade show in Dallas. America’s silencer makers are each doing their part. SWR Suppressors is asking survivalists to send a picture of their “bugout bag” for a chance to win an assault rifle silencer. The firm Silencero — “We Dig Suppressors and What They Do” — has put together a helpful “Silencers Are Legal” website and produced a series of would-be viral videos "