Here's a device that drains food from your stomach, via a tube, to the toilet


#1

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#2

I have one of those!


#3


#4

I’ve always said it would be awesome if we could just like eat to a second stomach that could charge your cellphone instead of making you fat. MAKE THIS HAPPEN, SCIENCE


#5

Requisite Unicorn Chaser:


#6

It’s technically possible.

It could even be possible to construct the device as an implantable artificial organ, grown from gene-modded stem cells.

We need a network of rogue gene/biomed labs working on such cool toys without bureaucratic meddling and without having to spend most of the effort by chasing grants.


#7

On one hand, yes.

On the other hand, this sounds like step 1 to Shadowrun’s organ rentals.


#8

We’re heading into a dystopia anyway. So let’s at least have the cool toys with it.


#9

My first thought was that this gives new meaning to the phrase “No shit” …

and then I had another thought …

.


#10

This is hilarious because fat people are fat?


#11

Now bulimics don’t have to purge anymore!


#12

I think it’s because lazy people are lazy.


#13

This is hilarious because the very concept is pretty gross, regardless of the user’s corporeal size.


#14

It’s not so much hilarious as sad.


#15

OMG, I can imagine so many downsides, including infection of the skin portal, leakage, and nutritional problems. But I guess it’s marginally better than surgery to reduce the stomach size.

From the Aspire website: “The AspireAssist is not approved for sale in the United States” but can be used in clinical trials. I feel sorry for any other countries where they might already be selling this.

People want a quick fix, I guess . . .


#16

Perhaps one could do a closed loop system


#17

I’m pretty sure there’s prior art by Dr. Steve Brule: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=INfEyMvb2-E

Its like having a summer house, for your body!


#18

If I run a hose down my throat can I be a fountain for Halloween?


#19

These devices were developed as a palliative for terminal cancer patients whose GI tracts are completely obstructed. The upper GI tract in those patients continues to secrete digestive fluids, but with nothing to digest (the patients have to be maintained on total parenteral nutrition) the fluids are merely a problem with no place to go. The patients often have only days or weeks of life remaining, but this is an intervention that allows them to spend the remaining time in relative comfort, when otherwise they’d be choking all the time on regurgitated stomach acid, or struggling with a nasogastric tube 24/7.


#20

Gif bank?