Here's what it looks like when 20 million bees escape all at once


#1

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#2

Bees were meant to be free, not kept in a cage!

…unless it's Nicholas Cage.


#3

20 million is more bees than the average truck. Why would one truck have so many? It's not like they sell them at WalMart?


#4

They're covered in BEEEESSSSS!


#5

It looks like photographers keep their distance, is what it looks like....


#7
    20 million is more bees than the average truck. Why would one truck have so many? It's not like they sell them at WalMart?

Likely crop pollination. I know during almond bloom season in California, 20 million would be a normal shipment.

from the article:

http://www.bakersfieldcalifornian.com/business/x54082722/ABUZZ-IN-KERN-Central-Valleys-lucrative-almond-pollination-attracts-nations-honeybees

"The state's 91 million almond trees, a fifth of which grow in Kern
County, rely on roughly 20 billion bees to carry pollen from one variety
of trees to another."

(Somehow I double posted and then deleted both when trying to delete the duplicate. Let's try this again.)


#8

Bees on a Truck. Someone call Sam Jackson. Or like, who's the B-Movie counterpart to Sam Jackson?


#9

So it wasn't neonics after all! The reason all the bees disappeared is because they were all on trucks that overturned, as this clearly demonstrates. Mystery solved!


#10

Nicholas in a cage... It's not like he's Winston in with the rats. If he'd have just shut the fuck up, he could have had a lovely beard, like those other calm guys. Are we still demonizing bees, like we are sharks? When are we going to realize that cats are the true threat?

Oh my God, I've stepped in it now, haven't I?


#11

#12

Made an account just to post this picture, got a message saying new users can't post pictures. So, http://i.imgur.com/kFDqu.jpg


#13

Delaware on Boing Boing again, exciting!

Unfortunately this article on the aftermath says no. Many hives were salvaged but as to the ones that couldn't be.

Wilmington firefighters and National Guardsmen were called to spray the containers Wednesday with a substance called Universal Gold Foam to disperse the insects.

"The foam actually doesn't kill them," Wilmington Fire Chief Anthony Goode said. "It just lays on top of all the debris that's in there so the bees don't have anything that they can penetrate or sit on, and it causes them to fly off. Hopefully, it's going to cause them to fly into the treeline."

Others foundered in the foam.

"They're doomed anyway," Delaney said. At this point, she said, the key is "to salvage as much as you can and make the area safe."

Also Delaware has a Honey Bee Swarm Removal Plan!

The accident shut the roadway for about 13 hours as emergency responders activated the state's "Honey Bee Swarm Removal Plan" for the first time since it was created 19 years ago, drawing local beekeepers and handlers to the scene, Shavack said.


#14

Holy hell, I always imagined a few thousand.


#15

Closer to the truth than you might think, actually. The annual convergence of billions and billions of bees for the almond crop is a great way to spread pathogens. One entomologist I talked to compared it to taking every kindergartener in the country, and putting them all in a gym, to share sniffles and coughs, then taking them back home. The bee industry is a lot more like the cattle feedlot industry than most people realize.


#16

Was the truck driver tested for exposure to neonictinoids or even nicotine itself? It has been my personal observation that truck drivers often dose themselves on nicotine.


#17

Bees riding cadillacs to Washington DC,
When I set my bees free!!


#18

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