How Crave designed the USB chargeable Bullet vibrator


#1

[Read the post]


#2

Every unit is run through a discharge and charge test to find any issues…

Yea, those things probably don’t carry much wattage, but I would imagine electrical safety would still be a concern.


#3

Ahem, I’d say so as well…


#4

Stainless steel is the opposite of hygienic. This is a common misconception.

Stainless is extremely durable and thus can be aggressively cleaned. Which makes it great for kitchen use, because you can force it to be clean using simple elbow grease. That being said, it’s basically a disgusting breeding ground for infection and will happily support colonies of human pathogens like MRSA and c. difficile indefinitely. Perhaps counterintuitively, this friendliness to living matter is what makes it useful for implantation in human bodies.

PS: Do not bleach stainless steel.


#5

Why not?


#6

I don’t think that is the concern here, as it’s using no more than 5 volts. You need more than that even to get a tingle. Rather, they need to ensure that they don’t deliver dead products to customers. It doesn’t appear to be repairable.


#7

Bleach corrodes stainless.


#8

Bleach seems to dissolve the protective oxide layer and rapidly corrode the raw metal beneath. When you see heavily rusted stainless, it’s typically due to salt or bleach or both.


#9

Doh, that explains my SS kitchen sink. :open_mouth:


#10

I, too, tend to learn these things the hard way.

I learned about the way stainless steel harbors bacteria when I was cleaning my kids’ stainless water bottles (that my scientist spouse bought for them, because she said their plastic bottles were leaching estrogen-mimicking compounds into the water). After a week at the bottom of a kid’s school locker, there was stuff growing in there that was like black kelp.

I eat and drink from glass, and prepare food on wood. Seems to work.


#11

Ah, but at what point do they qualify for “sex robot” status?


#12

And if she had used copper it would have been self-sterilizing…

I guess it’s just one more reason to carry hand sanitizer with you :\


#13

Disappointed by someone named Ti not making it in Titanium.


#14

Would also work for many copper alloys.

Silver does an excellent job here. I wonder if they could silver-plate the stainless steel.


#15

I too vote for Ti, if only because you can easily anodize it into wild colors.

titanium-anodized-rainbow-captive-bead-ring-2-ga.jpg

Magnesium is a neat metal to machine as well. By the way, can you machine borosilicate slugs, or do you have to mold it? That would be the ideal material, but would likely be a pain in the rear.


#16

Unless the workpiece or the swarf catches fire in the machine. That’s something that certainly brightens your day.

You can grind it to precise shape. But moulding is a more common way, though grinding may follow. I’d go for moulding here.

If you need machinability, there are machinable ceramics out there, though they are somewhat exotic.


#17

You should use a smaller one, then!

…I’ll see myself out…


#18

Something disturbing I’ve learned recently is that some copper alloys (read: brass / brasses) are frequently lead-bearing. Silver is nice if it weren’t so tarnishable… by sulphur… which is present in every cell…

Anyway I think bismuth-bronze sex toys would be great, rather non-toxic, self-sterilizing and impact resistant, if only by accident.


#19

Lead is often present in alloys that are intended for machining; it makes them behave much better under the tool bit edge. I’d say if it is not intended for prolonged contact with consumables (especially acidic ones) it’s rather harmless.

It is easy-ish to repolish, and the tarnish may even be considered looking vintage/antique. Or you can add a little germanium to the alloy, that will prevent tarnishing.

Aluminium bronze may also work well. It is used on ships as it inhibits growth of marine organisms, so it may have the oligodynamic effect as well.


#20

Honestly I’m leaning toward magnesium or titanium after everything suggested in this thread, but some organic or silicon based material is probably rather safe. I understand vitreous purists, though.

Aluminium has a reputation which may be undeserved, given the relative popularity of corundum. Some dementia correlation or somesuch. Nothing to scare deodorant manufacturers, surely.