Improved names for everyday things


#1

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#2

Finger-pants is great :smiley:

Reminds me of the literal German translation of gloves - “Hand-shoes”


#3

First of all, that’s “Horsenado”. If you’re going to inter-meme, do it right. Second:

Winter


#4

This has Tom Haverford written all over it.


#5

My wife coins wonderful ones… They love to tease her at work.
Unfortunately, my mind is blank right now.


#6

Dude - I came here to post exactly that.

HAHA - hand shoes. Those zany Germans. They hate making new words if they can just get by with combining existing ones.


#7

Would that be “mlank”?


#8


#9

you have embiggened by word list. thank you.


#10

Something like cow dog for goat or cheesy pasta for mac-n-cheese


#11

I had a brain fart the other day trying to talk about the kitchen sink, ended up calling it the “plug place”. It’s stuck around pretty well in our house


#12

Ooh yeah, I’d like to dump a liter of hop soda in my tooth-hole right now, but I gotta stay in money-jail for another hour and a half or so. But then I can go to the explosives-depot, and get my people-mover filled up with valuable solvents, and a couple of cheap barley pops for me too. Then, when I get home, I’ll play with my friend-beast.


#13

My contractually exclusive friend-beast doesn’t like me to call her that.

I have a neuro thing where names, especially proper names are really difficult for me(double that for foreign languages) so my friend-beast really gets a giggle seeing others, (like this and the XKCD which is on our food-cooler) do what I do every day. The people names thing is a real pain in the ass especially at gatherings, for others I can always use a thesaurus.


#14

I guess friend beast was ambiguous, I meant a beast who is my friend, in this case my dog, though I suppose you can mean it any way you like. I was just copying The Oatmeal’s coinage for his dog. But yeah, there’s a beautiful simplicity in the “up-goer five” type of noun substitution.


#15

Just did some research, horsebeast is woman, got it.


#16

I work in a very international group (I’m one of three native English speakers, in a group of around 50), so these names are normal. Which is wonderful. I find myself struggling not to adopt them.

My (German) girlfriend recently rejected ‘froglet’ as a word I’d made-up. She thought it too funny to be a real word.

Unable to find better words, I recently found myself asking, in rather broken French, if the hotel I was staying at had a bedroom for my bicycle. The nice lady on reception smiled, and showed me a room where I could store it overnight.


#17

That reminds me of David Sedaris recounting his trip to the French dentist in “Me Talk Pretty One Day.”

Describing past dental work he tells the dentist, “when I had of myself eight, I wore a fencepost in my mouth.”


#18

There needs to be a bicycle bedrooms international guide for folks out on cycle tour similar to the one for finding alcohol stove fuel. http://www.crazyguyonabike.com/doc/trangiastovefuelnamesaroundtheworld


#19

Teutonic literalism is fab. Where vacuum cleaners suck dust rather than clean vacuums.


#20

Friend of mine was complaining about her nominal aphasia once, but she had had a long day, and it came out as a complaint about drain bamage.