In 1950, four patriotic Scots stole a historic national relic from Westminster Abbey

#1

Originally published at: https://boingboing.net/2018/12/20/in-1950-four-patriotic-scots.html

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#2

Edward I really rubbed it in the Scots noses - putting it under his throne.

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#3

Ah! Some of those students were rooming at an aunt’s place.

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#4

Stole? I think the word is “retrieved”.

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#5
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#6

And here I thought that Pratchett’s story

https://wiki.lspace.org/mediawiki/Scone_of_Stone

was a feat of total imagination! O Pterry, we miss you so much.

I salute you, Ian Hamilton!
Here’s the Hamilton tartan by way of thanks:

https://www.tartanregister.gov.uk/tartanDetails?ref=1576

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#7

This is a fun fictionalised movie about the caper:

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#8

As I understand it, putting a ‘sacred stone’ under a throne’s seat used to be quite common. Mystical tradition; the stones would bring ‘sacred energy’ into the ruler or something like that.

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#9

Then, just over 300 years later, a Scot sat on the throne of England.

I don’t think Edward I thought that through properly.

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#10

Scone in this context is pronounced to rhyme not with “stone” or “gone” but with ‘‘spoon’’.

(Although Shakespeare rhymes it with ‘‘one’’ in the last two lines of Macbeth)

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#11

IIRC, Roger Daltry had something to do with it.
image

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#12

This interests me.
Would you be willing to list your source(s) or citation(s) here?

Whenever possible, I try to sound the least idiotic I can manage, and I thank you in advance for your help. As a U.S. midwesterner, with a love of history and the English language it all its variable forms, I find it does take work every single day.

Sometimes the work is fun:

https://www.npr.org/programs/wait-wait-dont-tell-me/676991850/wait-wait-for-dec-15-2018-with-not-my-job-guest-william-shatner?showDate=2018-12-15

from it, this:

https://www.npr.org/2018/12/15/676992201/panel-questions

#13

Surely the Scots were double-plus unfond of that “Hammer of the Scots” whose son (Ed II)

ends up in the Battle of Bannockburn [in Scotland, yes]. Spoiler alert: Robert the Bruce kicks English arse.

Battle of Bannockburn 1314 - Two Men in a Trench

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jvnsv-YJtF0

In this story the Scots, persistent, patient, working against against heavy odds, have long interested me. Now that I know of the Stone of Scone in added detail, the history just gets more interesting all the time.

The Stone of Scone was clearly taken [back] on King George’s watch…

strangely his Wikipedia entry lacks this historic detail. Hmpf! (Is there where I finally cave in and start an account on Wikipedia?)

Oh dear oh dear that the stone (after going back and forth for a bit) was only actually “returned” to Scotland for real in 1996.

ETA: trouble getting the Youtube link formatted properly

closed #14

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