In the new Periodic Table, some elements named for Japan, Moscow, Tennessee


#1

[Read the post]


#2

It’s nice to have something positive associated with Tennessee for a change.


#3

I knew they couldn’t do Nipponium due to IUPAC rules, but I’m glad they got around it. I’m still upset that there isn’t an element with the symbol No, however.


#4


#5

I recently had to make an HTML version of the periodic table for work with hyperlinks to element videos.

I was lamenting to coworkers about the stupidly unoriginal Latin and Greek-Latin names like Ununtrium (“one one three” in Latin) and Ununpentium (2x Latin ones and then a Greek five). They mentioned, “oh, those elements have been discovered, so the names should change.”

I’m not sure Tennessine is any better than Ununseptium though.


#6

Yeah, but come on, “Og”. That’s fabulous.


#7

We can pretend it’s named after Nanny Ogg.


#8

You forgot to mention Inobtrusium.


#9

Watch it yankee…


#10

Tennessine fits nicely under the other halogens with a similar naming convention (fluorine, chlorine, bromine, iodine, astatine, tennessine).

This native Tennessean with a degree in chemistry from Vanderbilt approves!


#11

You’re a stickler for details, and I love you for that. Indeed.


#12

Oh, and fastidium. Some think it’s basically the same as insoucium. As if.


#13

Can someone update the song?


#14

Don’t think it’s the Whiskey talkin, cause it’s the Slivovitz talkin really.

Dog bless me.


#15

Didn’t Hendrix do a better version?


#16

I’m still upset that there isn’t an element with the symbol No, however.

I have good news for you!


#17

Trivia: the Swedish village of Ytterby has four elements named after it, yttrium, erbium, terbium, and ytterbium.


#18

totally.

I think the Tennessee flag is the coolest one, or among the few cool ones in the union, anyway. The stars represent East, Middle, and West Tennessee, which are geologically distinct and fairly culturally distinct as well.


#19

What? No!


#20

Oh shit… I guess that shows which parts of Periodic Table I never use. I remember reading once about cultures that use all the parts of the Table, letting nothing go to waste.